Walk Sydney Streets Photos - Walk Walk Sydney Streets Photos - Sydney Walk Sydney Streets Photos - Streets Walk Sydney Streets Photos - Photos

x
Buy the Book Suburb Details Site Search

x

Free TRIVIA ANSWERS for 2008

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 26 December 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Yemen:

(1) Yemen is the only country name beginning with ‘Y’.

(2) An anagram of ‘Yemen” is ‘enemy’.

(3) The Kingdom of Sheba comprised all or parts of the present Yemen, Ethiopia and Eritrea. (Wikipedia)

(4) The average Yemeni woman gives birth to seven children.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 19 December 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Yahoo internet searches for 2008:

(1) The top spot for Yahoo searches went to singer Britney Spears.

(2) The top news story search was about hurricanes.

(3) Heath Ledger’s passing attracted the most searches about death.

(4) The top women’s search was for Angelina Jolie.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 12 December 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Christmas:

(1) The years 3, 4 or 5 BC are the favourites amongst historians for Jesus’ birth; virtually none suggest later. There was no year “0”.

(2) If you want acorns for Christmas, you should certainly plant the oak tree before March, at least 50 years before.

(3) Would you find Christmas Island in the Indian or Pacific Ocean? Yes. There are two islands names Christmas Island, one in each ocean.

(4) On Christmas Day 2007, Kathryn Robinson read the news on Sydney’s Channel 10 at 5pm. At 6pm her husband read the news on Channel 7.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 5 December 2008

Answers to last week’s logic questions, which were all from the book More Mind-Bending Lateral Thinking Puzzles:

(1) Why do you always seem to find something in the last place you look for it? Because you stop looking when you find it.

(2) Elizabeth the First became known as Elizabeth the First when Elizabeth the Second became Elizabeth the Second

(3) At 8.34 precisely, on the day that President Nixon resigned, he looked out of a south facing White House window but couldn’t see the top of the Empire State Building. Why not? The White House is in Washington and the Empire State in New York.

(4) From a balloon, stationary off the coast of Ireland, one full and one empty wine bottle were dropped off the side. Which hit the ground first? Neither, as it was over the sea.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 November 2008

Answers to last week’s lists questions:

(1) Forbes magazine’s list of the highest-earning deceased celebrities for the last year was 1 Singer Elvis Presley - $52M; 2 Cartoonist Charles M. Schulz - $33M; 3 Actor Heath Ledger - $20M; 4 Physicist Albert Einstein - $18M; 5 TV producer Aaron Spelling - $15M; 6 Author Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss) - $12M; 7 Singer John Lennon - $9M; 8 Artist Andy Warhol - $9M; 9 Actress Marilyn Monroe - $6.5M; 10 Actor Steve McQueen - $6M; 11 Actor Paul Newman - $5M; 12 Actor James Dean - $5M; 13. Singer Marvin Gaye - $3.5M.

(2) The 11 most unforgettable speeches as voted by Australians were: 1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr. I Have A Dream. Washington, 1963; 2 Jesus. Sermon on the Mount, ca27; 3 Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating. Redfern address. Sydney, 1992; 4 British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. We Shall Fight on the Beaches. House of Commons, 1940; 5. President Abraham Lincoln. Gettysburg Address, 1863; 6. President John F Kennedy. Inaugural Address, Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. Washington, 1961; 7 Earl Spencer. Funeral oration for Princess Diana. London, 1997; 8 Henry V. St Crispins Day speech before the 1415 Battle of Agincourt; 9 William Shakespeare, 1599; 10 Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. The Dismissal. Canberra, 1975; 11 Queen Elizabeth I. I have the heart and stomach of a king. Address to troops as Spanish Armada approached Britain, 1588

(3) The following made the list of the movie lines most used in everyday conversation: : "I'll be back" - The Terminator, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn" - Gone With The Wind, "Beam me up, Scotty" - Star Trek, "May the force be with you" - Star Wars, "Life is like a box of chocolates" - Forrest Gump, "You talking to me?" - Taxi Driver, "Show me the money" - Jerry Maguire, "Do you feel lucky, punk?" - Dirty Harry, "Here's looking at you, kid" – Casablanca, "Nobody puts Baby in the corner" - Dirty Dancing.

(4) The 12 most important medical breakthroughs are heart transplants, measles vaccine, blood grouping, structure of DNA, insulin, oral contraceptive, pacemaker, CAT scanner, organ transplants, cortisone, tuberculosis vaccine and polio vaccine.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 November 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Christian evangelist:

Billy Graham was the answer to each question. He turned 90 this month and his song-writer, George Beverly Shea, is 100 next February. Dr Graham has spoken in front of (ie face-to-face, not via radio or TV) more people than anyone else in history (nearly 215 million in 185 countries and territories). He has been an advisor to every US president since Harry Truman in the 1940s.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 November 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the US election:

(1) Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff cast their vote from the greatest distance, in space, as they are US astronauts.

(2) Barack Obama’s grandmother died on Sunday 2 November, just 48 hours before he was elected president.

(3) America now has its first black man as president. Had the Republicans won the election, they would have set two records, for the oldest first-term president and the first female vice-president.

(4) “Heartbeat” was used repeatedly during the election period to describe how far Sarah Palin would be from the presidency.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 November 2008

Answers to last week’s questions about American presidents:

(1) The "S" in Harry S Truman stood for nothing. He had no middle name. The “:S” was to avoid showing favouritism to either uncle, both of whose names began with "S". (Book of Facts)

(2) United States president James Garfield could write Latin with one hand and Greek with the other simultaneously. (Book of Facts)

(3) Each time before his plane took off US president Ronald Reagan superstitiously bowled an orange down the aisle. (Winning at Trivial Pursuit)

(4) At the end of 1998, the year when President Clinton faced accusations of lying about his sexual relations and impeachment, Americans voted Pope John Paul II as their second most admired man of the year. They voted President Clinton first, with an increase of four percentage points over the previous year. (Telegraph)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 31 October 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Melbourne Cup:

(1) Twice Melbourne Cup winning jockey Darren Beadman interrupted his riding career to become a preacher.

(2) Victoria’s Melbourne Cup Day holiday was originally called Sunday School Picnic Day. (Telegraph)

(3) Melbourne Cup winner Phar Lap’s name is Thai for lightning.

(4) Racing officials take great care in approving the names of racehorses, but Bucket of Vyno (rhymes with rhino) slipped through. What did listeners think the commentator for the horse’s first race was saying when he mentioned this horse? Buggered if I know. (Sydney Morning Herald)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 24 October 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on European languages:

(1) The official language of Vatican State is Latin.

(2) “Durchfall” , or “fall through”, is the German word for diarrhoea

(3) The Latin word “trivia” mean “three roads”

(4) In the French alphabet, what letter comes after rn? That’s a silly question. No letter comes after r and n alphabetically in any language, let alone French..

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 17 October 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on health warnings:

(1) Nytol sleeping tablets cartons had the warning “May cause drowsiness.” (Sydney Morning Herald)

(2) A decade ago, the Krooklok steering wheel lock carried the warning “Remove Krooklok before driving”. (Sydney Morning Herald )

(3) A warning on 2003 Toshiba laptops told you not to use it “on your lap”. (Sydney Morning Herald )

(4) If you were found to have two or more living bacteria in your intestines, your life expectancy would not be reduced. You already have about 100 trillion there.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 10 October 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on cars:

(1) The Model A Ford followed the original Model T Ford.

(2) The Model T Ford held the record for best-selling car until 1972. It was then overtaken by the Volkswagen Bug.

(3) The Model T Ford had no reverse gear.

(4) The Model T Ford had no brakes.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 3 October 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on USA towns:

(1) The town White House is in Tennessee. The building White House is in Washington, D.C.

(2) Metropolis is not only in Superman comics and movies. It’s a town in Illinois.

(3) Being a town in the warm state Florida, Frost Proof is virtually frostproof.

(4) There is somewhere you can go to Cut and Shoot in Texas. It’s a town of over 1,000 people, near Houston.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 26 September 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on shares.

(1) How much did Wall Street legend John Meriwether make for rich investors in 1998, using advanced mathematics and the nous of two Nobel Prize winners for economics? His “foolproof” method lost $10 billion. (Telegraph)

(2) Had you purchased $1000 worth of Westfield shares in 1960, they would have been worth $85 million four decades later. (Telegraph)

(3) BHP made a loss of $2.3 billion in the 1998-99 financial year, setting a target for American companies to better a decade later.

(4) Immediately after the 25 June 1999 announcement of its appalling 1998-99 performance, BHP’s shares rose, by 47c to $17-29. (Sydney Morning Herald)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 19 September 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Paralympic Games:

(1) Dutch athlete Esther Vergeer sure is good at wheelchair tennis. At this month’s Paralympic Games she won her 345th consecutive match.

(2) The consultants hired by Sydney 2000’s cash-strapped Paralympics organisers to help raise funds managed to get $623,440, less than half what they were paid. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(3) For 12 months before the 2000 Paralympics, Sydney’s Manly Council urged its 33,000 residents to donate to Australia’s Paralympics team. Flyers encouraging donations accompanied rate notices to 18 000 rate-payers and large collection boxes were put on counters at council offices. They raised $43. (Telegraph)

(4) In the Seattle Special Olympics (for mentally or physically disabled athletes) there were nine competitors in the 100m running final. One tripped soon after the start and was slightly bruised. What was the race result? In one of the great Olympics stories, the other eight all went back to comfort the one that had fallen. They then linked arms and walked together to the finish. The whole stadium stood and cheered for 10 minutes.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 12 September 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on traffic offences:

(1) The 24-year-old driver on Sydney's Old South Head Road booked for travelling at 130kmh in a 70kmh zone told police that he had just washed the car and was driving fast to dry it off. (Telegraph)

(2) The 22-year-old man doing 129kmh in a 60kmh zone at St Georges Basin told police that he was tired and was speeding to wake himself up.

(3) The Heckenberg 17-year-old's use of a lawn-mower resulted in a charge of using a weapon to avoid arrest. He had thrown the ride-on lawn-mower from the back of his stolen car into the way of pursuing police.

(4) You aren’t fined anything if you drive at 65kmh in a 60kmh limit in Sydney. You are given a 10% margin.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 5 September 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the rules of tennis:

(1) There are three players in games of cut-throat tennis.

(2) A serve is a fault if, in the umpire’s opinion, you took a swing at the ball when you missed or caught it.

(3) There are no restrictions on the size and shape of a tennis racquet. (Trivial Pursuit)

(4) If you win the toss you can choose to serve, receive, select end or make your opponent choose.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 August 2008

Answers to last week’s Olympic Games questions: 

(1)  No African country won a gold medal in the first six days of the 2008 Olympics. 

(2)  As a Muslim from Bahrain, Roqaya Al-Gassra won her heat of the 200 metres track event in 2008 in full-body clothing. 

(3)  He won the uneven bars event, but US gymnast Nastia Liukin was given the silver medal. Why was this? “He” is the surname of China’s He Kexin. 

(4)  Australian star BMX rider, Tanya Bailey, conducted a frantic search for her sunglasses during the Olympics. Where did she find them? On her head. (Telegraph)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 August 2008

Answers to last week’s Olympic Games questions:

(1) TV coverage of the Beijing opening ceremony had spectacular aerial pictures of a fireworks display including footprints dotted across Beijing. These pictures were prepared a year or so in advance with the help of animation techniques and slotted into the live coverage. To make them appear live, haze was blended in to take into account the poor visibility during the ceremony. (Telegraph)

(2) The audience for the opening ceremony was enthralled by the singing of a young Chinese girl. What did the audience not know about her singing? It wasn’t her singing. She was miming that of another girl, who wasn’t considered suitable to appear on screen.

(3) Gold medal winner for the 100m breaststroke, Liesel Jones, had the 11 fastest times for this event.

(4) Swimmer Alain Bernard was on top of the world after breaking the world record for the 100m freestyle on 13 August. Five minutes and five seconds later his record was broken in the next semi-final.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 August 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Olympic countries:

(1) The USSR first competed in the Olympic Games in 1952.

(2) The only countries to have competed in every modern Olympics are Greece, Australia, France, Great Britain and Switzerland.

(3) All of the following applied to the Tunisia teams in the 1960 Rome Olympics: They were awarded no points in the riding event because all their riders fell from their horses. One of their swimming team almost drowned. The judges removed the Tunisians from the shooting because they feared for their lives. Only one team member knew anything about fencing, so they kept sending him out until the third bout, when an opponent ripped his visor off. (Signs of the Times)

(4) The USA won all of the track and field events in the 1904 Olympics except for the 56-pound weight throw. (Lyle Brown’s Sports Quiz)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 August 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Olympic Games cities:

(1) The first Olympic Games of the modern era were held in Athens in 1896. The Olympic Games 10 years later were in Athens again. This was an additional Games between normal Olympiads.(Guinness Book of Records)

(2) None of the modern summer Olympic Games have been in South America or Africa.

(3) Two of the modern summer Olympics have been in the southern hemisphere - Melbourne and Sydney.

(4) Other than Melbourne and Sydney, the closest Olympics city to the southern hemisphere is Mexico.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 August 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on USA town names:

(1) Truth or Consequences is a town in New Mexico, USA.

(2) Ralph Edwards, host of the radio show “Truth or Consequences” offered an annual celebration and nationwide broadcast to any city willing to change its name to Truth or Consequences. The 7000-population town became Truth or Consequences in 1950. It is usually called T or C.

(3) North Pole is a town in Alaska. (National Geographic)

(4) Fairview is the USA’s most common town name. Next come Midway and Oak Grove. (National Geographic)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 July 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on diseases:

(1) The Oxford dictionary defines "disease" as "unhealthy condition of the body or mind; sickness; illness". The world's most widespread disease is therefore tooth decay (Bulletin)

(2) According to the Australian Dental Association, it is best to use no toothpaste. (Sunday Telegraph)

(3) The approximate percentage of adult residents of Ghana who have malaria is 100 per cent.

(4) The youngest person to have a heart transplant was aged one hour 40 minutes.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 July 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Catholic Church:

(1) The Catholic Church’s World Youth Day in Sydney lasted six days

(2) Stephen II reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for two days.

(3) Archbishop Hugnes was aged five when he became Archbishop of Reims in the 10th century.

(4) The last abdication of a pope was in 1294.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 July 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Zimbabwe:

(1) The significance about Australian Industrial Relations Minister Peter Reith’s comment that “waterfront productivity levels in Australia are not much better than in Zimbabwe” is that Zimbabwe has no waterfront.

(2) The weight of the money carried to the shops in Zimbabwe can be greater than that of the shopping you bring back.

(3) The inflation rate in Zimbabwe has now (June 2008) passed one million per cent.

(4) Everyone in Zimbabwe who can buy a piece of one slice of bread is a millionaire. A loaf now costs 200 million Zimbabwe dollars.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 July 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on politicians’ quotes:

(1) How did Winston Churchill reply when MP Nancy Asler said: “Winston, if I were married to you, I’d put poison in your coffee”? He replied: “Nancy, if you were my wife, I’d drink it.” (Readers’ Digest Book of Facts)

(2) How did Winston Churchill reply when Labour MP Bessie Braddock said: “Winston, you’re drunk”? He replied: “Bessie, you’re ugly. And tomorrow morning I shall be sober.” (Readers’ Digest Book of Facts)

(3) It was French president Charles de Gaulle who said “How can anyone govern a nation that has 246 different kinds of cheese?” (Mensa Family Quiz Book)

(4) US President Richard Nixon said “I shall resign the presidency, effective noon tomorrow”.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 27 June 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on serving at Wimbledon:

(1) Pete Sampras won 94 consecutive service games in the 1997 Wimbledon men’s singles.

(2) Wayne Arthurs went better by winning 111 consecutive service games in 1999.

(3) Taylor Dent lost to Wayne Arthurs in four sets at Wimbledon in 2002 without losing any of his service games. The three sets he lost were all on tie-breaks.

(4) Tim Henman’s great grandmother was the first person to serve over-arm at Wimbledon; his grandmother was the last person to serve under-arm. (Sydney Moring Herald)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 20 June 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Queen’s Birthday holiday:

(1) The Queen's Birthday is celebrated in most of Australia on the second Monday in June. Her actual birthday is April 21.

(2) Western Australians celebrate Queen Elizabeth’s birthday about as far away as possible, ie almost six months. Their Queen’s Birthday holiday is on the last Monday in September or the first Monday in October.

(3) Unlike just about everyone else, Falkland Islanders celebrate the birthday on the real date.

(4) The United States, Japan and Singapore also have a holiday for someone's birthday. It’s George Washington in USA, the Emperor in Japan and Buddha in Singapore.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 13 June 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the weather:

(1) The seasons start at the beginning of March, June, September and December in Australia, but on the 21st of those months in most countries. The Australian dates resulted from penal colony soldiers complaining of having to wear heavy winter uniforms for the first 21 days of September and the British Government’s agreeing that they could discard them from the start of the month. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(2) A typhoon is a violent hurricane. (Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary)

(3) When reporting extreme temperatures, journalists love to tell us that “the mercury climbed to…”

(4) In winter it can reach minus 20C in the town Hell, Norway.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 6 June 2008

(1) The French for “fortnight” is “quinze jours” (15 days). This might explain why the French championships starts a day earlier than other grand slam events, ie on Sunday rather than Monday.

(2) In the fortnight of the 1979 French tennis championships, Bjorn Borg broke strings in 60 racquets. (Book of Sports Lists)

(3) Of the 32 men who reached the third round of the 2007 French singles, only one, Lleyton Hewitt, had English as his native language.

(4) Frenchman Yvon Petra was the last Wimbledon men's singles winner to play in long trousers. (Sunday Telegraph)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 May 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on English pronunciation:

(1) The two words that rhyme out of carton, package, contain and mountain are carton and mountain.

(2) What do the following words have in common: orange, purple, plagued, film, month, bilge, bulb, warmth, scarce, spoilt, twelfth and silver? Each word is unique in that it has no other word that rhymes with it. (Q&A)

(3) There are nine different ways of pronouncing the letters “ough”: bough, cough, hiccough, lough, ought, rough, though, through, thorough (Oxford English Dictionary).

(4) The shortest sentence incorporating all the pronunciations of “ough” is: Though coughing and hiccoughing, a thoroughly-rough ploughman fought through loughs.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 May 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on inventions:

(1) Microwave ovens, mobile phones and personal computers first went on sale in Cuba in 2008. The microwave was first sold elsewhere in 1947 and the mobile (cell) phone in 1973.

(2) The seventh most influential person of all time, Ts’ai Lun, invented paper. (Top 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History)

(3) According to a Massachusetts Institute of Technology survey, the three most-hated inventions are the mobile phone number one, followed by alarm clock and television. (Choice magazine)

(4) The ancient Greeks invented democracy and coins.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 May 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Antarctica:

(1) The world’s last unowned land is in Antarctica.

(2) Antarctica’s size is 3.2 million hectares or 6.4 million hectares, depending on when you measure it. It doubles each winter by the formation of sea ice. (Time)

(3) Australia’s territory significantly reduced in size a decade ago when an iceberg of several hundred square kilometres broke away from Australian Antarctic Territory.

(4). The South Pole was last at the North Pole about 30,000 years ago. The Earth's magnetic field sometimes flips for 10,000 or more years. (Reader's Digest Book of Facts)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 May 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on snail mail:

(1) Other than royalty, the first living person to appear on an Australian postage stamp was cricketer Sir Donald Bradman. (Telegraph)

(2) There are 12 2-cent stamps in a dozen.

(3) There were no ponies in the Pony Express. They were all horses. (Strange But True)

(4) The first English men to be featured on US postage stamps were Alfred Hitchcock, Winston Churchill and the Beatles

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 May 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Olympic torch:

(1) After being extinguished by rain, Montreal’s stadium flame was relit by a cigarette lighter.

(2) For the Beijing relay, 20,000 torches have been produced.

(3) The 2004 torch’s relay visited all previous Olympic cities.

(4) The Olympic torch is normally housed overnight in its own five-star hotel room.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 April 2008

Answers to last week’s Olympic Games questions:

(1) The Olympic torch relay was invented by the Nazis for the 1936 Berlin Games. Hitler loved a torch-lit procession. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(2) The normal word for “torch” in America is “flashlight”.

(3) The next Olympic Games begin at 8.08pm on 08-08-08.

(4) Olympic gold medals are made from bronze. (Book of Sports Lists)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 April 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on food inventions:

(1) Forrest Mars invented the Mars Bar.

(2) Clarence Birdseye invented frozen food.

(3) The Earl of Sandwich invented the sandwich, so that he would not have to leave the card table for dinner. (Ripley's Book of Chance)

(4) Belgium invented French Fries. (“Can Elephants Swim?”)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 April 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on demography:

(1) Humans make up less than 5 per cent of the New Zealand population. Sheep do very well amongst the other 95 per cent.

(2) New York has more Irish than Dublin, more Italians than Rome and more Jews than Tel Aviv.

(3) Vatican State has the lowest recorded birth rate of any independent state, although it would have good reason for not recording births.

(4) The average age of the 10 million population of Senegal is 18 (Sydney Morning Herald)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 April 2008

Answers to last week’s questions about the internet:

(1) The site www.shibumi.org/eoti claims itself to be last page and end of the internet.

(2) The common abbreviation that takes three times as long to say as what it stands for is www.

(3) The quote “circulating items that aren’t relevant about things that don’t matter to people who aren’t interested” was a description of emails.

(4) Prosecutor Ken Starr’s report on American President Clinton attracted the then record number of internet hits in one minute, 340 000. (Sun-Herald)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 March 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on world government:

(1) Every household in Switzerland and Kennesaw county in the American state Georgia is required to own a gun.

(2) The first country to recognize the United States was Morocco (Book of Facts)

(3) Italy had 59 governments from 1945 to 2001.

(4) Somalia had no government from 1991 to 2005.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 March 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on music:

(1) 33rpm records had two grooves—one on each side.

(2) The three most frequently sung songs in English are Happy Birthday to You, For He's a Jolly Good Fellow and Auld Lang Syne.

(3) The popular 19th century English morning concerts were held In the afternoon.

(4) The oldest type of musical instrument known to have been used by man is the drum. (Telegraph)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 March 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on cricket:

(1) Graeme Smith and Neil McKenzie broke the record for a test opening partnership by 2 runs with a score of 0 for 415 on 2 March 2008.

(2) South Africa’s Dudley Nourse hit nine consecutive sixes in Egypt in 1943. (Trivial Pursuit)

(3) The highest score from one over is 286 declared. “The Times” diary says that in Western Australia in 1894 a ball from Cogg was hit into the three-pronged fork of a nearby tree. The umpire ruled that the batsmen should keep running as the ball was still visible. Two fielders climbed the tree but the lower branches collapsed. They searched for an axe to chop the tree down but eventually got hold of a rifle. By this time the batters had completed 286 runs and declared. (The Return of Heroic Failures)

(4) Australia smashed the one-day innings record of 398 in the one-day match on 12 March 2006.The record was broken the same afternoon, in South Africa’s innings.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 March 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on Cuba:

(1) The US has had sanctions against the Cuban government for 40 years.

(2) What did Cuban President Fidel Castro, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, French Presidents Charles de Gaulle and Francois Mitterand, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahatir, American President Ronald Reagan and Indonesian President Suharto have in common regarding their ages when their terms ended? All were over 75. Castro was 81,Churchill 80, de Gaulle 79, Mitterand 78, Mahatir 78, Reagan 77 and Suharto 76.

(3) Not all Morons live in Cuba. Some live in Moron in Mongolia; the other Morons are in Argentina, Venezuela and Cuba.

(4) Since the US does not issue its citizens visas for travel to Cuba, how can they drive from New York to Cuba? Drive from New York, New York, to Cuba, Kansas.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 February 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on world swimming records:

(1) Eamon Sullivan is the world’s fastest ever swimmer, having broken the 50 metres record on 17 February, 2008.

(2) Poland’s Otylia Jedrzejczak spends most of her time telling people how to spell her name. Otherwise, she is a former holder of the 200 metres fly world record.

(3) Former world 50m record-holder Brett Hawke took no breaths during his races.

(4) At age 15, John Konrads held all swimming records from 200 metres to 1500 metres.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 February 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on books:

(1) According to Guinness World Records, the world's best-selling non-fiction book is Guinness World Records.

(2) Most library book collections are arranged by subject, some by author or title. But the millions of books, pamphlets and magazines of the Research Libraries of the New York Public Library are arranged by height.

(3) The word that begins the title of each of Francis Bacon's 58 essays is “of”.

(4) None of William Shakespeare’s plays were published during his lifetime. (Ripley's Book of Chance)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 February 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons):

(1) The average age of the last six Mormon presidents/prophets at the end of their presidencies (which co-incided with the end of their lives) was 91. David O McKay, the ninth prophet, lived to 96; Joseph Fielding Smith 95; Harold B Lee 75; Spencer W Kimball 90; Ezra Taft Benson 94; and Gordon Hinckley, who died last month, 97. If we ignore Harold, the average age was a very impressive 94.

(2) The average age of Mormon missionaries, called elders, is somewhat less - 20.

(3) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints first allowed black people to be members in the 1970s.

(4) How can you be baptised after reaching adulthood and not know you have been baptised? By being dead and getting baptised by proxy. Mormons are baptised on behalf of their ancestors.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 February 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on cats:

(1) In Swaziland, lions are called lions.

(2) Lions and tigers sleep for up to 17 hours in each 24.

(3) A cat can detect its owner's individual footsteps from 30 metres away.

(4) Benito Mussolini’s pet and often travelling companion was a lion.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 February 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on the Australian Open tennis championships:

(1) Michael Chang did not play in the 1993 Australian Open Tennis Championships because he was attending Bible class for the fortnight.

(2) In the 2005 Australian championships, Joachim Johansson broke the record for the most aces in a professional match with 51. He lost in four sets.

(3) The 1977 Australian Open champion Roscoe Tanner was in jail in 2006, for fraud and failure to pay maintenance.

(4) The Lleyton Hewitt - Marcos Baghdatis Australian Open match finished at 4.32am on 20 January 2008.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 January 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on boxing:

(1) The flamboyant sportsman who first made the quote “I am the greatest” was American wrestler Gorgeous George. Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) followed.

(2) Heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali’s daughter excelled in heavyweight boxing

(3) Heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman named all of his four sons George.

(4) Australian boxer Les Darcy did not participate in any sport after the age of 21 because he died at 21. (Winning at Trivial Pursuit)

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 January 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on test cricket:

(1) In the second test against Australia in October 2002, Pakistan broke its lowest ever test innings score of 62 with a 59. Ordinary cricket teams would have been satisfied with that achievement, but not Pakistan. In their second innings they broke it again, with 53.

(2) When Matthew Hayden scored a century in that second test against Pakistan in October 2002 he beat the whole Pakistan team. His 119 was higher than the total of their two innings.

(3) Matthew Hayden was dropped for 23 consecutive tests after his debut in March 1994. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(4). Southampton Solent University has awarded Dr Shane Warne an honorary doctorate.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 January 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on names and occupations:

(1) The Catholic archbishop for Manila, Philippines until 2005 was Cardinal Sin.

(2) The Seventh-day Adventist Church’s publishing house in Spain is headed by Jesus. His full name is Jesus Jimenez.

(3) New Zealand’s spokesperson for BP is Bepe. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(4) Chris Lamb is the spokesperson for Britain’s Meat and Livestock Commission.

_________________________________

Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 January 2008

Answers to last week’s questions on seas and oceans:

(1) The Black Sea is bordered by Russia, Turkey, Romania and Bulgaria; the Red Sea by Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt; the White Sea is in Russia and the Yellow Sea in China and Korea.

(2) The Pacific Ocean is larger than the United States and Europe combined because it is larger than all of the world’s land area combined.

(3) The Tasman Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean.

(4) There are eight Twelve Apostles along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. The ninth collapsed on in 2005.


_________________________________

Trivia Collection

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

To Top


PageHeading


 


Home | Surprises | Secrets | North | East+City | South | West | Collections | About Us | Trivia | Contacts