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Free TRIVIA QUESTIONS for 2006

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 29 December 2006

This week’s subject is world palaces.

(1) At what time does the Changing of the Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace commence? (a) 10.00 (b) 11.00 (c) 11.27

(2) How many rooms are there in the Sultan of Brunei's palace? (a) only 5, but they are the size of a football field (b) 173 (c) 1744

(3) Did Saddam Hussein have a lavish palace?

(4) Whose right arm and whose hair are in the Sultan's Palace in Istanbul?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 22 December 2006

Before we’re too late, this week’s subject is Christmas.

(1) Is Christmas Day the busiest or quietest day of the year at London’s Heathrow Airport?

(2) At Christmas we hear about the baby Jesus being wrapped in “swaddling” clothes. What does “swaddling” mean?

(3) How many days are there in the Twelve Days of Christmas?

(4) Who lives in the Finnish town Rovaniemi?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 15 December 2006

This week’s subject is Hobbies

(1) Dutchman Nick Vermeulen, a frequent flyer, collected 2112 of these; aircraft enthusiast Ron Sherwin of St Ives, England, collected 150 different types. What did they collect?

(2) What form of art does Christo practise?

(3) How do Australians aged 10 to 17 spend most of their time?

(4) This question is from “Trivial Pursuit”: what does a spermologist collect?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 8 December 2006

This week’s subject is Vegetables.

(1) What prevents you from burning your tongue when you have gazpacho soup (ingredients are tomato, ground red pepper, garlic and cucumber)?

(2) What is the world's most commonly-eaten food?

(3) Botanically, what is an onion? (a) a fruit (b) a vegetable (c) a lily

(4) What is the average number of peas in a pod?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 1 December 2006

With the retirement last week of Ian Thorpe, one of the greatest swimmers ever, he is this week’s subject.

(1) Ian Thorpe was 15 in 1998. What was his shoe size then? (a) 9½ (b) 11 (c) 17

(2) In how many consecutive nights did Ian Thorpe break a world record in the 1999 Pan Pacific championships?

(3) There are only nine letters in Ian Thorpe’s name, yet the name of one of his main rivals had 22 letters. Who was that?

(4) Why did Daniel Kowalski try to avoid finishing second or third in heats or semi-finals?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 24 November 2006

This week’s subject is continents.

(1) What continent has the lowest average elevation?

(2) What is the smallest continent?

(3) Which continents have only one nation?

(4) Besides Antarctica, which is the only continent that is free from landmines?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 17 November 2006

Following the death sentence pronounced on Saddam Hussein, this week’s subject is execution.

(1) What were the surnames of the three men hung at Greenberry Hill, London, for the murder of Sir Edmund Berry? (The answer is in the question.)

(2) Why did 20 000 people assemble in Tehran in August, 1997, to watch what a mobile crane was doing?

(3) What was the first country to abolish capital punishment?

(4) What was the occupation of John Roose, the first person in the UK to be executed by being boiled to death?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 10 November 2006

This week’s subject is world movies

(1) What movie had the most film extras?

(2) The world's first fire-proof theatre, the Iroquois, opened in Chicago on 1 December 1903. What happened thirty days later?

(3) The South Koreans found the film "The Sound of Music" too long for screening in their theatres, so it was edited. What parts were cut out?

(4) What are the most popular type of movies in Saudia Arabia’s movie theatres?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 3 November 2006

Australia stops for 10 minutes on the first Tuesday in November each year for the running of the Melbourne Cup, so we get in early with this week’s subject, horse racing.

(1) How does the Melbourne Cup differ significantly from the world's other major horse races?

(2) In a Sydney race in 1903, High Flyer, Loch Lochie and Bardini finished in a triple dead heat. Where did High Flyer finish in the re-run?

(3) How did Itchy Palm fare in the sixth race at Sydney’s Canterbury on 8 February 1998?

(4) Seven Toronto stockbrokers worked on the seventh floor of a building with street number 777. On 7-7-77 they bet $777 on the seventh horse in the seventh race, over seven furlongs. Where did the horse finish?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 27 October 2006

This week’s subject is the Catholic Church wordlwide.

(1) On top of what did St Simeon the Younger live for his last 45 years until he died in AD97? (a) Mount Vesuvius (b) The Vatican’s Sistine Chapel (c) a stone pillar

(2) Who is the subject of more statues throughout the world than anyone else?

(3) Which country has the most Catholics?

(4) What was unusual about tens of thousands of people in St Peter’s Square, Vatican City, clapping Pope John Paul on 2 April 2005?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 20 October 2006

This week we are going to study French.

(1) Where is the world's second-largest French-speaking city?

(2) How was the word “ouija”, as in “ouija board”, derived?

(3) What is the French word for weekend?

(4) What is significant about the French sentence “Allez porter ce whisky au vieux juge blond quie fume” (“Go take this whisky to the old blond judge who is smoking”)?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 13 October 2006

This week’s subject is Birds.

(1) What is unusual about the cuckoo’s nest?

(2) What is common to all the odds and ends collected by bower birds?

(3) For how long can the sooty tern remain continuously aloft, ie without landing? (a) less than 20 seconds (b) as long as it takes to fly to Costa Rica, normally three weeks (c) 10 years

(4) What is the collective noun for owls?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 6 October 2006

This week’s subject is ants around the world.

(1) Which are more destructive—termites or white ants?

(2) Where are kidnapping and slavery still frequently practised by non-humans?

(3) After heavy rain has flooded their nests, how do the Malaysian cataulaucus muticus ants clear their nests of water?

(4) What do Asia’s leaf-carter ants do?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 29 September 2006

Following the death this month of legendary Steve Irwin, known as the Crocodile Hunter, this week’s subject is crocodiles.

(1) How many crocodiles lived in Zimbabwe’s Lake Kariba at its peak? (a) 200 (b) 25 000 (c) no crocodiles, but 30 000 alligators

(2) How did a crocodile come to be cruising down the main street of Katherine in Australia’s Northern Territory in January 1998?

(3) A crocodile can move quickly on land. If you are chased by one, in which direction should you run?

(4) Alligators are similar to crocodiles. How many alligators live in the Alligator River in Australia’s Northern Territory?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 22 September 2006

This week we look at presidents around the world.

(1) What was Nelson Mandela’s occupation for the 27 years before he became president of South Africa?

(2) Did Egypt’s President Anwar Sadat allow his picture to be published in the country’s newspapers?

(3) Who was the only American president who didn’t belong to a political party?

(4) Are the president and prime minister of Poland closely-related?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 15 September 2006

This week’s subject is national anthems.

(1) What country's national anthem begins with the words "Oh, say"?

(2) Approximately what percentage of Greeks know all the words of their national anthem? (a) 0 (b) 50 (c) 100

(3) The national anthems of Japan, Jordan and San Marino all have the same number of lines. How many is this? (a) 4 (b) 10 (c) 50

(4) Who is the only person named in Australia’s national anthem? (a) a seaman (b) a queen (c) a prime minister

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 8 September 2006

This week’s subject is world water transport

(1) The liner "Resolution", which features two swimming pools, a gym, four squash courts and a library, was approved for takeover by the British government in April 1997 to cater for a clientele of 500. Who were these clients? (a) British politicians (b) priests (c) prisoners

(2) Sir Francis Drake started his round-the-world voyage in the "Pelican" and finished it in the "Golden Hind". What happened to the "Pelican"?

(3) One of Sweden’s most popular tourist attractions is the “Wasa”, one of the largest ships ever of the royal fleet. Why was its maiden voyage memorable?

(4) When does the ferry depart on its route between Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, and the airport peninsula?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 1 September 2006

With the last tennis grand slam event for the year under way, this week’s questions are about the US Open.

(1) What did John McEnroe do the first time he stepped onto the same court as Bjorn Borg and Arthur Ashe?

(2) Why did Jaslyn Hewitt have difficulty deciding who to support out of Lleyton Hewitt and Joachim Johansson in the semi-final of the 2004 US Open?

(3) In the final of the 2004 US Open, did Roger Federer have much of a lead on Lleyton Hewitt?

(4) Who was Tim Henman speaking about after the 2004 US championships when he said: “If you could combine Agassi’s ground strokes, Roddick’s serve, Hewitt’s speed and determination and my volleys, you’d have a chance of beating him”?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 25 August 2006

This week’s subject is world weather.

(1) Why are ferrules more frequently seen in wet weather?

(2) Which continent has no thunderstorms?

(3) If a hurricane (northern hemisphere) rotates in one direction and a cyclone (southern hemisphere) rotates in the other, what happens if they cross the equator?

(4) In which months does snow fall on Australia’s highest mountain, Mt Kosciuzko? (a) June and July (b) May to August (c) all year

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 18 August 2006

This week’s subkect is fish around the world.

(1) Where do young Malawi cichlid fish hide when danger threatens?

(2) What is the main food for the Nile Perch in Uganda’s Lake Victoria?

(3) In what Australian river are Murray Cod found?

(4) Why can’t a Bombay duck fly?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 11 August 2006

As a follow-up to our Lebanon and Israel questions, this week’s subject is weapon failures in wars.

(1) What was the surname of the first man wounded by shrapnel?

(2) Why was the British World War II No 74 (ST) hand grenade, featuring an adhesive coating that enabled it to stick to the side of an enemy tank, not successful?

(3) What was hit by the first bomb dropped by Russian aircraft when they attacked Finland on 30 November 1939? (a) the plane that dropped it (b) a Russian submarine (c) the Soviet legation in Helsinki

(4) How were an estimated 40,000 to 80,000 men killed by gunfire in World War 1 in the Tyrolean Alps yet without being hit by gunfire?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 4 August 2006

No prizes for guessing that this week’s questions will be about Israel.

(1) Is the capital of Israel Jerusalem or Tel Aviv?

(2) Can Arabs be elected to Israel’s parliament, the Knesset?

(3) What does Israel’s Anna Smashnova do?

(4) What is the unique feature of the timetables of El Al, the Israeli airline?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 28 July 2006

Lebanon has dominated the news in the past week, so it warrants some attention here. The first questions helps us get started. If you want to cheat, this week’s questions are from material on the BBC News site.

(1) What was the first Arab country to permit private radio and TV stations?

(2) The government of Lebanon decides what TV stations can broadcast which one of (a) news (b) music or (c) children’s programmes?

(3) In the 20 years from 1975, what main regional powers used Lebanon as a battlefield for their own conflicts?

(4) Besides food, what is Lebanon’s main export? (a) arms (b) oil (c) tobacco

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 21 July 2006

This week’s questions are about Egypt.

(1) How many of the Seven Wonders of the (Ancient) World remain?

(2) Approximately how many days’ walking is it from the Great Pyramid to the nearest shop?

(3) How do you spell the name (beginning with “P”) for the ancient rulers of Egypt?

(4) A crossword clue: Egyptian flower (4)

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 14 July 2006

Following North Korea’s missile tests of the last few days, it’s time to have some more questions about that country.

(1) What two words do Australian media most commonly use when referring to North Korea? (a) North Korea (b) rogue state (c) developing nation

(2) How far can North Koreans legally drive from home without approval for further travel? (a) they can’t leave their suburb (b) 5km (c) only to neighbouring countries, except travel to South Korea is not permitted

(3) In November 1998, how much admission did North Korea say that it would charge foreign inspectors to check the contents of a large hole? (a) nothing, provided they saluted the North Korean flag (b) pensioners’ rates of the equivalent of 12 Australian cents (c) US$300 million.

(4) How does North Korea’s President Kim Jong II travel to foreign countries to meet their presidents? (a) boat (b) train (c) private 747 aircraft that includes spa and gym

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 7 July 2006

This week the questions are about Wimbledon men players.

(1) How many Wimbledon titles did Ivan Lendl win?

(2) Boris Becker became the youngest ever winner of the Wimbledon men's singles in 1985. The 1986 champion was the second-youngest. Who was he?

(3) Who was the last married man to win the Wimbledon singles?

(4) And how long ago was that? (a) last year (b) 12 years (c) more than 20 years

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 30 June 2006


It’s the Wimbledon tennis fortnight. Firstly we look at ladies at Wimbledon and next week it’s the men’s turn.

(1) English number one Tim Henman's great grandmother was the first person to play a certain stroke at Wimbledon; his grandmother was the last person to do it the opposite way at Wimbledon. What did those ladies do?

(2) Billie Jean King won a record 20 Wimbledon titles. The largest ever number (30,500) of tennis spectators saw her play a singles match at Houston, Texas, in 1973. What was unusual about her opponent?

(3) How many Wimbledon singles finals did Chris Evert lose? (a) 0 (b) 7 (c) 10

(4) What misfortune does Chris Evert share with Wimbledon commentator Fred Stolle? (a) they both lost three consecutive singles finals (b) they were both born on 29 February, so only have a birthday party on the right day once every four years (c) they both had an injury as teenagers, forcing them to change their playing hand

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 23 June 2006

This week the questions are about the world’s highest mountain, Mt Everest.

(1) Last month New Zealand’s Mark Inglis reached the summit of Mt Everest. What does he lack that one might expect are important for climbing?

(2) Japanese mountaineer Junko Tabei climbed to the summit of Mt Everest in 1975. What was special about that?

(3) One thousand people have reached the summit of Mt Everest; how many have died trying to reach it? (a) 7 (b) over 100 (c) over 150

(4) How many corpses lie on Mt Everest? (a) 14 (b) 100 (c) 120

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 16 June 2006

This week’s questions are on the World Cup football. (Australians are still getting used to calling the sport “football”. Until the recent official change, we called it “soccer”.)

(1) What does each player of the Brazilian team do immediately before playing to help it win its World Cup matches? (a) prays (b) puts his right foot onto the field first when coming on for the match (c) coats a miniature Brazilian flag in honey and places it under his singlet

(2) What World Cup team has Bora Milutinovic coached? (a) USA (b) Mexico (c) Costa Rica (d) Nigeria (e) all of the above

(3) What caused the war between El Salvador and Honduras in 1969? (a) murder of El Salvador’s president (b) cheating at football

(4) How many people were injured when a woman accidentally drove into a crowd celebrating France’s World Cup win in the Champs Elysées, Paris, in July 1998? (a) 17 (b) 22 (c) 150

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 9 June 2006

With the French Open tennis championships into their final week, that’s our subject this week.

(1) How good was the remarkable recovery by American player Chanda Rubin in the 1995 French Open?

(2) The French-derived words “love” and “deuce” are used for zero and 40-all at three of the Grand Slam championships. At which Grand Slam are they not used?

(3) Do the French use “quarante auch” (40-all) or “égalité” (equal) for “deuce”?

(4) What did Andre Pavel do during the third set of his quarter-final match in the 2202 French singles? (a) break the Guinness Book of Records entry for most bananas consumed in three minutes (b) drive 14 hours return to his hometown in Germany for the birth of his son (c) model for a Nike commercial by continuing to serve after game had been called and his opponent was sitting courtside

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 2 June 2006

As we now have a special section on our site for fences, that’s our subject for this week.

(1) Where is the world’s longest fence? (a) Texas (b) Siberia (c) Australia

(2) What does it keep out? (a) road runners (b) snow (c) dogs

(3) Why did thousands of people flock to Sydney’s Coogee Beach in February 2003 to look at a fence? (a) the virgin Mary was said to appear as an optical illusion on one of the beach’s fence posts (b) a surfer was attempting the world record for fence-sitting

(4) An easy one to finish with: why did an African rock python get stuck in the fence of a Miami turkey farm on October 14, 2005?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 26 May 2006

This week’s subject is world trees.

(1) The world's tallest living things are also the largest and oldest living things. What are they?

(2) What does Australia’s Forest Protection Society support?

(3) When is the only time an African boabab tree’s blossoms open?

(4) What destroyed many Norfolk Island pine trees? (a) the Qantassaurus (b) the elliptic eel (c) the orchestral honeybee

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 19 May 2006

This week’s questions are on the Pacific Ocean country, Solomon Islands.

(1) Where was Charles Dausabea when he was appointed the Solomons Islands’ Minister for National Security and Minister for Police on 5-5-06? (a) in Disneyland (b) in a brothel (c) in jail

(2) Where was Nelson Ne’e when he was appointed the Solomons Islands’ Minister for Culture and Tourism on 5-5-06? (a) in Disneyland (b) in a brothel (c) in jail

(3) What is the traditional dress at custom villages on Guadalcanal Island, Solomon Islands?

(4) Are Solomon Islands TV networks operated by the government or commercial organisations?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 12 May 2006

This week it’s taxation around the world.

(1) What is significant about income tax in Bahrain and Norfolk Island?

(2) How many of the 16 Australian Football League clubs were named in 1998 by the Australian Tax Office as having been prosecuted for tax evasion?

(3) Of what was Al Capone finally convicted?

(4) In a five-page judgment, what did the Australian Tax Office determine is “the primary constituent” of frozen yoghurt?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 5 May 2006

With Queen Elizabeth II having celebrated her 80th birthday last weekend, we now look at some questions about British royalty.

(1) Who is the only person in England who does not need a car licence plate?

(2) Who is Lilibet?

(3) Who is the present Duke of Lancaster?

(4) Who was Time magazine’s Man of the Year in 1952?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 28 April 2006

Outside of Australians, Americans are the most frequent visitors to our site. This week we honour, sorry – honor, them by looking at American inventions.

(1) What did Texan Bob Bemer invent? (a) the ring-pull can (b) the computer escape key (c) the safety pin

(2) What did American president Thomas Jefferson invent? (a) daylight saving (b) coat-hangers (c) post-it notes

(3) What was the occupation of New York’s Dr Albert Southwick, inventor of the electric chair?

(4) When Thomas Edison invented the phonograph, predecessor of the record player, what was the first recording he made? (a) The Star-Spangled Banner (b) Mary Had a Little Lamb (c) Morse Code for SOS

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 21 April 2006

As it’s the Easter season we look at celebrations this week.

(1) In what painful way do about 12 courageous Filipinos from Pedro Cutud village celebrate Easter each year?

(2) What weapons are used by residents of the Spanish Town Buñol in their annual “La Tomatina” festival? (a) Tommy guns (b) squashed tomatoes (c) goats

(3) On 10 May 1975 in Washington DC, there were 600 arrests, 150 smashed windows, 42 looted refreshment stands, 17 stonings of uniformed officers, 33 fires, 14 cars demolished in Constitution Avenue and 120 cases of public brawling. What day was being celebrated?

(4) In which month do Russians celebrate the October Revolution?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 14 April 2006

This week, let’s see how much we know about Uzbekistan.

(1) What did establishments named “Internet Café” in Uzbekistan lack as recently as 2003 that we would expect to find in buildings displaying that name?

(2) How much is the highest-value currency note in Uzbekistan worth? (a) A$500 (b) A$5 (c) less than A$2

(3) What is Uzbekistan’s Erk? (a) their unit of currency (b) a word for freedom (c) an opposition political party

(4) What role did opposition parties play in the 2004 December Uzbekistan parliamentary elections?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 7 April 2006

This week we do the Pacific Ocean country, Tuvalu.

(1) Should you take altitude sickness medication if you are about to attempt a climb to Tuvalu’s highest point?

(2) From which of the following does Tuvalu derive significant income? (a) selling its internet domain letters, tv. to TV companies (b) selling much of its “900” international telephone code space to foreign companies, most of which use the numbers to sell phone sex (c) tourism

(3) From how many countries can you fly to Tuvalu?

(4) Can you name all of Tuvalu’s rivers?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 31 March 2006

This week we look at the tiny African country Swaziland.

(1) Is the King of Swaziland married?

(2) Did his father have more than one wife?

(3) What did the Speaker of parliament steal from the king to throw the kingdom of Swaziland into political crisis in March 2000? (a) cow dung (b) five of his fleet of limousines (c) his palace

(4) If you got the previous question correct, you’ll have no trouble with this one: What was the fine for a man soliciting sex with a woman in Swaziland in 2002? (a) one cow (b) 100 Swazi dollars (c) 100 US dollars

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 24 March 2006

This week’s questions are also on the Commonwealth Games

(1) Two days before the 2006 Commonwealth Games opened, four teenagers were apprehended while trespassing inside the arena. As well as being illegally in, they were illegally out. How could this be?

(2) Was the youngest competitor in the 2006 Commonwealth Games in his upper or lower teens?

(3) Queen Elizabeth officially opened the 2006 Commonwealth Games. Was the national anthem “God Save the Queen” played or sung at the opening? (a) no (b) yes (c) partly – the first half of the first verse (d) partly – the second half of the first verse

(4) The following British Broadcasting Corporation description refers to what country competing this week in the Commonwealth Games? “After lurching from one military coup to another, [X country] now has an elected leadership. But it faces … breaking apart on religious and ethnic lines.”

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 17 March 2006

In Australia and the rest of the British Commonwealth, we are in the middle of the Commonwealth Games. That’s our subject for this week.

(1) Lisa Curry-Kenny represented Australia in swimming, winning seven Commonwealth gold medals. To what is she allergic?

(2) The 1998 Commonwealth Games were held in Malaysia. How long was it since the previous Commonwealth Games were in Asia?

(3) The oldest world swimming record in 1998 was the nine-year-old men’s 200m freestyle. By how much did Ian Thorpe fail to get that record in the 1998 Commonwealth Games? (a) one one-100th of a second (b) one 10th of a second (c) one second

(4) Why was Jeff Kennett, premier of the Australian state Victoria, confident of winning the 2006 Commonwealth Games for his capital city, Melbourne?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 10 March 2006

This week we look at North Korea.

(1) Whose photo must be displayed in every household in North Korea?

(2) Who has North Korea decided will be their president in 2100?

(3) Who can use the centre lane on North Korea’s main roads?

(4) What are all North Korean men required to wear? (a) a head covering (b) long trousers (c) a lapel pin bearing the president’s name or photo

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 3 March 2006

This week’s questions are about Myanmar, formerly Burma

(1) For what purpose did London activist James Mawdsley travel to Myanmar three times? (a) to compete in the Burma Open Golf Championships (b) to investigate the proliferation of the cane toad (c) to get himself jailed

(2) Myanmar, Liberia and USA are the only three countrie to retaiun what form of measurement?

(3) Myanmar’s God’s Army was led by 12-year-old twins. Were they smokers?

(4) What protects the top of the Shwe Dagon pagoda in Myanmar from rain?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 24 February 2006

With the winter Olympics nearly over, that’s our topic for this week.

(1) Australia had 24 contestants at the 1998 winter Olympics in Japan. How many officials did we send? (a) 8 (b) 16 (c) more than the number of contestants

(2) Why was Eddie the Eagle the most publicised contestant at the 1988 Calgary winter Olympics, and probably the most famous winter Olympian ever?

(3) What was Australian Steven Bradbury doing in his speed-skating final of the 2002 winter Olympics that enabled him to beat the other five contestants for the gold medal? (a) coming last (b) skating backwards

(4) Commentators for the winter and summer Olympics have a habit of creating a verb from a noun when reporting on competitors who have gained a first, second or third place. What is this “verb”?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here
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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 17 February 2006

Back to Africa this week, and we look at Mali:

(1) Why can President Toure’s party not be faulted? (a) the penalty for criticising his party is death (b) Mali citizens believe that his party is God-ordained (c) he doesn’t have a party but went into the election with the support of 22 minor parties

(2) How much of each year does the spiritual chief of the Dogon village, Endé, in Mali, spend in his cave half-way up a cliff overlooking the village? (a) most nights (b) 365 hours (c) 364 days

(3) Where do backpackers sleep when they stay at guest accommodations in Dogon Desert villages?

(4) Why did Mali not use the Olympic swimming pool built for it by Russia?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 10 February 2006

It’s about time we looked at Iraq.

(1) Until 2002, what percentage of spectators at Iraq sporting events were female?

(2) What happened when Iraqi terrorist Khay Rahnajet didn’t pay enough postage on a letter bomb he sent?

(3) In spite of losing the Gulf War and leading his country to ruin, Iraqis returned Saddam Hussein to power in October 1995 by a margin of millions of votes. Why?

(4) According to UN inspectors, Iraq produced 8 000 litres of anthrax spores during the 1980s. How many people could this amount have killed? (Your first guess is too low.).

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 3 February 2006

This week it’s Cuba.

(1) How many people attended the one-day trial of Cuban murderer Major Blanco? (a) one, the judge (b) 12, the judge and 11 prosecutors (c) 17 000

(2) How did Australian sports star Susie Maroney travel to the United States from Cuba on 12 May 1997?

(3) To what countries besides Cuba does the US not allow its citizens to travel?

(4) In which country that the United States is not on friendly terms with does it lease 36,000 acres for a naval base?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 27 January 2006

This week it’s the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which we’ll just call Congo.

(1) What is special about “ilunga”, a word from the Tshiluba language spoken in Congo? (a) it is their word for both “yes” and “no” (b) it means “a person who is ready forgive any abuse for the first time, to tolerate it a second time, but never a third time.”

(2) Where did Brazzaville, Congo, finish in the 2003 Quality of Life survey of world cities?

(3) Why was a Congo football team unable to complete an October 1998 match through injuries even though the opposing team had no injuries? (a) all of them were killed by lightning (b) they had an all-in brawl with themselves over who should be captain (c) an earthquake hit their side of the field

(4) What event is expected to be held this year in the Congo, for the first time since 1960?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 20 January 2006

This week it’s Namibia’s turn.

(1) A map in the “Lonely Planet” guidebook for Namibia shows 14 towns in the 250km west of Eenhana. How many of these towns’ names begin with “O”?

(2) With Dundozonananandana being the name for a mountain range in Namibia, you could guess what continental European language is most widely spoken in that country, couldn’t you?

(3) Which team won the 2003 World Cup match between Australia and Namibia?

(4) Botswana was preparing itself in July 1998 for war with Namibia. The dispute was over possession of two islands. What were the islands’ inhabitants? (a) Botswanans (b) Namibians (c) hippos

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 13 January 2006

This week we look at Burkina Faso, another small African country.

(1) The name of Burkina Faso’s capital city has 11 letters; an astonishing eight of these are vowels. What is it?

(2) What does “Burkina Faso” mean? (a) high and mighty (b) land of honest men (c) he conquers who conquers himself

(3) What is the salient feature of the country’s navy submarines?

(4) Who or what are Burkinabe?

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 6 January 2006

This week we look at the small African country Equatorial Guinea.

(1) Does the equator run through Equatorial Guinea?

(2) Why did Equatorial Guinea’s Eric Moussambani receive more publicity world-wide in the 2000 Olympics than any other swimmer?

(3) For how many months does the wet season last in Equatorial Guinea? (a) they have negligible rain (b) 3 months (c) 10 months

(4) Since independence in 1968, Equatorial Guinea has had two rulers. What relationship was the current president, Obiang Nguema, to President Francisco Nguema, in 1979, who was tried and executed? (a) former best friend (b) nephew

Free trivia answers to these trivia questions are here


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Trivia Collection

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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