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Free TRIVIA QUESTIONS for 2007

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 4 January 2008

This week’s subject is seas and oceans.

(1) In what countries are the Black, Red, White and Yellow Seas?

(2) Is the area of the Pacific Ocean larger than the United States and Europe combined?

(3) Where does the Tasman Sea meet the Pacific Ocean?

(4) Victoria’s Great Ocean Road has stunning Southern Ocean scenery, including the island rock formations known as the Twelve Apostles. How many Twelve Apostles are there?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 28 December 2007

This week we have a really exciting subject for you – mathematical definitions.

(1) How does the Concise Oxford Dictionary define the word "thirteen"?

(2) For what was the definition "the distance travelled by a beam of light in a vacuum in one 299 792 458th of a second" adopted internationally in 1983? (a) one kilometre (b) one mile (c) it was just a nonsense dreamed up by the BBC’s Science Scene.

(3) Of what is the inch one five hundred-millionth? (a) the earth’s polar diameter (b) the distance travelled by a beam of light in a vacuum in one 299 792 458th of a second (c) the width of the English Channel at its narrowest point

(4) What is the Roman numeral for zero? (a) O (b) they didn’t have one

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 21 December 2007

This week’s subject is 2007 highlights

(1) What did Ethiopia celebrate in September 2007, several years late according to us?

(2) How many skips were proven on video in 2007 for a Guinness Book of Records world record for skipping stones on water? (a) 11 (b) 21 (c) 61

(3) What inflation rate did Zimbabwe achieve in 2007? (a) down to 1% (b) a steady 9.5% (c) 3007%

(4) In their 16 games in the 2007 season, Australia’s Wollondilly White Waratahs rugby team had not scored a point, and had had 1864 points scored against them. What happened in the last five minutes of their last match?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 14 December 2007

This week’s subject is Christmas

(1) What did the General Court of Massachusetts ban in 1659? (a) observance of Christmas (b) drinking alcoholic beverages in public (c) having cats as pets

(2) How many "White Christmases" has Australia had? (a) none (b) three (c) over 200

(3) On what day of the year was Jesus born?

(4) To what population group did police in Holbeck, Leeds, England, send their 1997 Christmas cards? (a) burglars (b) politicians (c) church ministers

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 7 December 2007

John Howard last week became the first Australian prime minister for 80 years to lose his seat in an election. He is this week’s subject.

(1) For many years, the deputy leader of the Liberal Party, Peter Costello, was upset because the prime minister, John Howard, had blocked his opportunity to be leader of Australia. What is Mr Costello’s middle name?

(2) When Mr Howard introduced a goods and services tax after having promised not to do so, how did he explain the move? (a) times have changed (b) I was misquoted (c) it was not a core promise

(3) Did the brothers of Liberal Party leaders John Howard and Peter Costello also support the Liberal Party?

(4) What was the occupation of the candidate who beat John Howard in the 2007 election?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 30 November 2007

Australia had a federal election on 24 November, so Australian elections is our subject for this week.

(1) Which of the following was banned from running in the 2001 Australian federal election but was eligible for following elections following an amendment allowing names changed by deed poll? (a) Jason MeTerrorist (b) Nigel Freemarijuana (c) Alison Noban Ecstacy

(2) Who challenged retired businessman Lynn Standfield for One Nation preselection for the seat of Lyne in the 2004 federal election? (a) his wife, Joan (b) Pauline Hanson (c) Colleen Blanch, later revealed to have been three years old

(3) How many parties contested the 1998 Australian federal election? (a) 6 (b) 8 (c) 86

(4) How many of Deadly Serious Party, Australian Recreation and Fishing Party, Taxi Operators Political Service (Oceania) and Weekend Trading Party were parties contesting the 1998 Australian federal election?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 23 November 2007

If our trivia questions have driven you nuts, this week’s subject is especially for you. It’s psychology.

(1) What do polls show that Americans fear most?

(2) Of what is keraunothnetophobia a fear? (a) satellites plunging to earth (b) trivia questions (c) ingrown toenails

(3) Of what do you think phronemophobia is a fear?

(4) Of what is pantophobia a fear? (a) monkeys wearing red baseball caps and carrying new umbrellas (b) opening refrigerator doors (c) being run over by semi-trailers driven by elderly ladies (d) all of the above

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 16 November 2007

This week’s subject is surnames worldwide.

(1) Who was the first victim of a boycott?

(2) What is the most common surname worldwide? (a) Chan (b) Smith (c) Yen

(3) Donald Death jnr, 60, of Locust Valley, New York, USA, was charged in April 2005 with stealing $US300,000. From where did he steal it? (a) a cemetery (b) a prison office, next to a gallows (c) Fort Knox

(4) Where would you find Erica Morningstar?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 9 November 2007

The first Tuesday in November is the day for Australia’s famous horse race, the Melbourne Cup. That is this week’s subject.

(1) What has been the other occupation of twice Melbourne Cup winner, jockey Darren Beadman?

(2) What was Victoria’s Melbourne Cup Day holiday originally called? (a) Racing Day (b) Fortune Day (c) Sunday School Picnic Day

(3) What time did the NSW Government choose to release its controversial 30,000-page contract with the builders of the Cross City Tunnel?

(4) What does the name of Melbourne Cup winner Phar Lap mean?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 2 November 2007

This week’s subject is first (given) names.

(1) Since 2005, what has been the most common first name for baby boys in Brussels, Belgium?

(2) What is Zambian boxer Makina’s precious first name?

(3) What were the given names of Madam Tusaud, Frankenstein, Clouseau, Rambo, Jekyll and Liberace?

(4) How would you explain this finding after only two questions by a detective in an area of Bali with tens of thousands of people? Detective: “Was the offender a tourist or born here?” Witness: “Born here.” Detective: “How many brothers and sisters has he?” Witness: “He has no brothers or sisters.” Detective: “It must have been Wayan then.”

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 26 October 2007

This week’s subject is geometry. (Yes, even geometry can be a bit of fun.)

(1) What shape is a grain of salt?

(2) What is the shortest route for an ant to take from a top corner of a cube to the opposite bottom corner?

(3) What method allows you to draw an egg-shaped object?

(4) How far away is the horizon if you are standing at sea level?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 19 October 2007

The internet is our subject for this week.

(1) What is the most commonly-used password on computer systems?

(2) What internet activity has been Nigeria’s biggest foreign currency earner?

(3) What was the first email message? (a) Will you marry me? (b) qwertyuiop

(4) What does the “http” before web addresses stand for?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 12 October 2007

This week’s subject is chemistry

(1) What is the chemical symbol for ice?

(2) How can sand be made invisible?

(3) How big a dose of anthrax is needed to kill someone?

(4) Zymurgy is a branch of applied chemistry. What is special about this word?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 12 October 2007

This week’s subject is chemistry

(1) What is the chemical symbol for ice?

(2) How can sand be made invisible?

(3) How big a dose of anthrax is needed to kill someone?

(4) Zymurgy is a branch of applied chemistry. What is special about this word?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 5 October 2007

This week’s subject is elementary logic.

(1) Which of the leopard, bat and owl sees most clearly in total darkness?

(2) How was Sheriff Tom Jones able to ride into town on Friday, stay three nights and leave early Sunday morning?

(3) How was a prisoner able to survive 10 weeks in a cell without water, and with a 20cm thick steel door between him and a fresh water well in the next cell?

(4) Aron Ralston, who had climbed 49 of Colorado’s 4200m peaks, was trapped for six days in Canyonlands National Park in Utah when he was pinned by a 400kg boulder that shifted on to his right arm. Clearly he could not move the boulder and no-one else could come to help him. His only equipment was ropes, anchors and a pocket knife and his water was almost exhausted. How did he free himself?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 28 September 2007

This week’s subject is cricket.

(1) Which of the following applied to Kenya’s team in the ICC Twenty20 match in Durban on 12 September 2007? (a) They were three down for 0 (b) The first four batsmen scored 0 (c) Six batsmen scored 0 (d) Seven batsmen had surnames starting with O (e) The first three bowlers had surnames starting and ending with O (f) all of the above

(2) Who won Cricket NSW’s inaugural Steve Waugh Medal for the outstanding player of the 2002-2003 season?

(3) Greg Blewett unfortunately was out for 99 in a test match against the West Indies in 1997. What was his highest score in the tests against New Zealand the same year?

(4) New Zealand fast bowler Geoff Allott said he hoped for a place in the record books, but was surprised when he entered the records for batting. He batted for 101 minutes at Eden Park on 2 March 1999 against South Africa. What was his score?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 21 September 2007

This week’s subject is multiple marriages.

(1) Marriage counsellor Glynn de Moss Wolfe's 29 marriages made him the world-record holder for most-married man. What world record did his last wife, Linda Essex-Wolfe, hold?

(2) How did comedian Stan Laurel get on with his second and third wives after he separated from them?

(3) Why did Ukrainian Vanda Vorotova not keep any contact with seven of her eight husbands?

(4) How many children does Utah resident Tom Green have? (a) 12 (b) 15 (c) 33

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 21 September 2007

This week’s subject is multiple marriages.

(1) Marriage counsellor Glynn de Moss Wolfe's 29 marriages made him the world-record holder for most-married man. What world record did his last wife, Linda Essex-Wolfe, hold?

(2) How did comedian Stan Laurel get on with his second and third wives after he separated from them?

(3) Why did Ukrainian Vanda Vorotova not keep any contact with seven of her eight husbands?

(4) How many children does Utah resident Tom Green have? (a) 12 (b) 15 (c) 33

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 14 September 2007

Leaders of countries around the Pacific have just finished talks in Sydney. This week’s subject is quotes from former heads of three of the countries that were represented at the talks.

(1) When asked by an Australian reporter how he felt about so many New Zealanders leaving his country to live in Australia, which New Zealand Prime Minister replied “It’s good. It’s improving the average IQ of both countries”?

(2) What American president said to his wife after being wounded by a would-be assassin’s bullet: “Sorry, honey, I forgot to duck.”?

(3) Why did President Reagan announce that he was going to start bombing Moscow in five minutes?

(4) When an interjector at a political rally called out, "Tell us all you know, Bob, it will only take a minute", what Australian prime minister replied: “ I’ll tell you all we both know. It won’t take any longer.”?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 7 September 2007

A fortnight ago a full eclipse of the moon was observed in several countries, including here in Australia. The moon is this week’s subject.

(1) What is receding from Earth at the rate of 2½cm each year?

(2) How much longer does the moon take to circle the Earth each year than it did the previous year? (a) less than a minute (b) it takes exactly the same time

(3) What makes a blue moon look different from other full moons?

(4) Can the Apollo astronauts’ footprints remain on the moon much longer?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 31 August 2007

With the US Tennis Open under way, it is the subject of this week’s questions.

(1) How many former US Open women’s singles champions are contesting this year’s title?

(2) Why was Renee Richards barred from the 1977 US Open Women's Singles?

(3) On what surface did Jimmy Connors win the US singles?

(4) Who was the first unseeded lady to win the US singles?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 24 August 2007

This week’s subject is Alan’s old school, Sydney Boys’ High, and its rugby team.

(1) St Joseph’s First XV rugby union team beat Sydney Boys’ High School’s First XV by 114-0 on 10 August 2002. By what score did St Joseph’s beat Sydney High’s Second XV on the same day? (Yes, go for it. Co-incidences happen.)

(2) Four days after their 114-0 loss to St Joseph’s, only eight of their 34-player squad attended Sydney Boys’ High’s scheduled training session at Centennial Park. Why did the other 26 not attend?

(3) A decade ago, how many rugby teams did St Joseph’s, Hunters Hill, have playing each Saturday afternoon? (a) 2 (b) 30 (c) 40

(4) Was Sydney Boys’ High School’s top rugby team successful in its first six matches of 2007?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 17 August 2007

Following the collapse of the Minneapolis bridge earlier this month, this week’s subject is bridges.

(1) The opening ceremony on the new suspension bridge at Aucayacu in Peru was attended by local dignitaries who cheered and popped champagne bottles. For how long was the bridge in service before it collapsed? (Keep your guess short.)

(2) The town Ironbridge in England is named after its bridge, the oldest of its type in the world. Of what is its bridge made? (a) iron (b) steel (c) wood

(3) How many of the 29 bridges spanning the Rhine were destroyed in World War II?

(4) The 113-metre Aberfeldy Golf Club bridge in the UK is the longest bridge of its type in the world. Of what is it made? (a) wood (b) steel (c) plastic

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 10 August 2007

With the Tour de France just finished, that is this week’s subject.

(1) Where did the 2007 Tour de France start?

(2) Why were approximately half of the 1998 Tour de France contestants disqualified?

(3) What did Lance Armstrong achieve after winning a battle with what was believed to be extensive terminal cancer?

(4) From what country did the second-placegetter in last week’s Tour de France come?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 3 August 2007

This week’s subject is travel by air.

(1) Sydney’s Sunday Telegraph offered readers the chance to win a trip to Mars. How was it able to do this?

(2) What record did pioneer aviator Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith, the first person to fly across the Pacific, set for Sydney to Melbourne?

(3) What city has the most people travelling to work by helicopter? (a) New York (b) Sao Paulo (c) Warsaw

(4) Between what two airports is the world’s shortest intercontinental commercial flight?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 27 July 2007

This week’s subject is world flags.

(1) Besides green, what colours and designs comprise the Libyan flag?

(2) The US flag has 50 stars, representing the 50 states. How many stripes does it have, and what do they represent?

(3) What is the origin of the Red Cross symbol?

(4) What is unusual about the flags of Indonesia and Monaco?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 20 July 2007

This week’s subject is the America’s Cup

(1) What is the longest winning streak in major sport?

(2) What is the world's oldest sporting trophy?

(3) What is incongruous about Switzerland winning the America’s Cup in 2003 and retaining it this month?

(4) What sport did Henry Beard and Roy McKie define as “the fine art of getting wet and becoming ill while slowly going nowhere at great expense”?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 13 July 2007

This week’s subject is carnivores:

(1) What non-contact defensive weapon is used by the American animal of the genus "Mephitis"?

(2) In what does a fox wrap itself to keep warm?

(3) Most herbivores rise rear feet first. What do carnivores do?

(4) What is the quietest sound that can be heard by the world’s smallest fox, the fennec? (a) a cockroach running on sand (b) a lion roaring 10m away

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 6 July 2007

This week’s subject is world finance:

(1) You know who Sri Muda Hassanal Bolkiah Mu'izzaddin Waddaulah DK, PSPNB, PSNB, PSLJ, SPBM, PANB is, don’t you? What world record did he hold until Bill Gates took over?

(2) The company owned by the brother of the Sultan of Brunei was found to have lost up to 27 billion dollars. What portfolio did he once hold in the Brunei ministry?

(3) The assets of the world’s three richest people exceed the combined GDP of how many of the world’s poorest countries? (a) 4 (b) 8 (c) 48

(4) Gail Kelly, chief executive of Australia’s St George Bank, has how many triplets?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 29 June 2007

Golf’s US Men’s Open is over and Women’s Open about to start, so this week’s subject is golf.

(1) Approximately 10 per cent of people are left-handed, yet more than 20 per cent of major tennis titles are won by left-handers. What about golf majors?

(2) Has Scott Draper been a professional golfer or tennis player?

(3) What did Birdie Kim shoot on her final hole to win the 2005 US Open?

(4) What distinguishes Alexis Thompson in this week’s US Women’s Open?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 22 June 2007

This week’s subject is molluscs

(1) Within a margin of 1kmh, at what speed does a snail move?

(2) An octopus has how many hearts? (a) 1 (b) 2 (c) 3

(3) What shape is the pupil of an octopus’ eye?

(4) What is the defence tactic of a frightened octopus?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 15 June 2007

This week’s subject is Australian industry

(1) The world’s smallest gas cylinders were made in Australia exactly 10 years ago. Could 25,500 of them fit into two garbage trucks?

(2) What does “made in Australia” tell you about the country of origin of the product’s ingredients?

(3) How was the stationery store W. C. Penfold’s delivering orders to customers in the centre of Sydney city in 2004?

(4) Does Lindsay Fox own a truck?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 8 June 2007

It would not be out of place for a web site such as ours to have some trivia questions on walking. So here goes for this week:

(1) The material "Eco Fleece" (survival clothing for cold weather bushwalking) is 80 per cent made from (a) grass (b) headache tablets that have passed their use-by date (c) PET soft drink bottles

(2) In the 1950s, the fine for jaywalking in New York City was $2. How much was the fine 50 years later?

(3) Why do many elderly people in Asia walk backwards? (a) mental reason (b) through fear of attack from behind (c) religious reason (d) medical reason

(4) Thousands participated in a 2.7km walk between the Sydney suburbs Arncliffe and Mascot in 1999. Why were they not at all interested in the weather forecast for the period of their walk?

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 1 June 2007

With the 2007 French Open tennis getting under way, that is our subject for this week

(1) How many times has the winner of the French men’s singles been beaten in the first round the following year?

(2) Why was 30 May 2000 a special day in the French Open? (a) it was the only day in the history of the French Open when no matches could be played because of rain (b) it was the first use of instant replay of disputed calls for umpires (c) a trial, soon abandoned, was held of counting let serves as being in play

(3) Two left-handers met in the 2005 men’s singles final. When was the previous occasion? (a) 1946 (b) 2004

(4) And a general clay-court question: In the lead-up to this year’s French championships, Nadal was beaten by Federer to end his 81 consecutive wins on clay. If your opponents were of the same standard as you, what would be your chances of winning 81 consecutive times? (a) less than 1 in 200 (b) about 1 in a thousand (c) 1 in about 1 followed by 24 zeros

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 25 May 2007

This week’s subject is world rivers.

(1) How many rivers are there in Alaska? (a) thousands of lakes but only one river (b) 50, the same number as the “50th state” (c) 3000

(2) How many of Europe's 10 longest rivers are in the former USSR?

(3) By the time it reaches the sea, how many litres of water is discharged per second by the Colorado River, which formed and now flows through the Grand Canyon?

(4) How many rivers flow into Lake Nicaragua? (a) 4 (b) 5 (c) 45

Here are the free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 18 May 2007

This week’s subject is animal food.

(1) For how many hours a day do elephants eat? (a) 3 (b) 6 (c) 18

(2) What do rabbits eat to help them stay alive during bad weather periods when their normal food sources are unavailable?

(3) What is the animal kingdom’s fussiest eater?

(4) Which drinks more on an average day: a baby koala in its coastal tree habitat or an adult meerkat in its African desert habitat?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 11 May 2007

With all the discussion about whether Prince Harry should lead his troop in Iraq, it’s time for some British royalty questions.

(1) Henry VI, the youngest king of England, became king at what age? (a) eight days (b) eight months (c) eight years

(2) What was King George VI's first name? (a) Albert (b) George (c) Gorgeous

(3) Why did Britain's King George I and his prime minister, Robert Walpole, converse only in Latin?

(4) At age 94 the Queen Mother had a hip replaced by a male surgeon. In 1997, at age 97, she had another hip replacement operation, this time by a female surgeon. How were the surgeons related?

Here are free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 4 May 2007

With the cricket world cup drawing to a close, this week’s subject is cricket.

(1) How could a team win a cricket match by batting for five seconds and without hitting a ball? King's College Choir School did that against Trophy Boys XI at Cambridge.

(2) What occupation did West Indies cricketer Wes Hall take up after his sporting career? (a) jail inmate (b) church minister (c) manufacturer of chinaware

(3) What are the first names of the Sri Lankan cricketer whose surname is Amunugama?

(4) How many balls were bowled in the longest over in test cricket history? (a) 10 (b) 12 (c) 15

Here are free trivia answers to these trivia questions

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 27 April 2007

Following the American student’s killing of 32 people at the beginning of the week, this week’s subject is murder.

(1) What category of people were discovered by a 1995 study in Finland by the Department of Forensic Psychiatry to be the people most likely to commit a murder?

(2) Where are most Japanese shot dead? (a) in their homes (b) on the street (c) outside Japan

(3) What happened to murderer David Herman the day after he was saved from a suicide attempt in Dallas in April 1997?

(4) What did the English painter Richard Dadd do to his Dad?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 20 April 2007

Our web site has a toilets section, so it’s about time we had some toilet trivia questions.

(1) In a row of toilet cubicle, which one should you use?

(2) From a choice of kitchen chopping board, sink and toilet seat, on which should food be prepared to minimise bacteria contamination?

(3) How do toilets in El Salvador save you time?

(4) What unusual service provided by people on tricycles was introduced in China’s northern provincial capital, Taiyuan, a decade ago?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 13 April 2007

This week’s subject is spiders.

(1) What colour is a spider’s blood?

(2) How many eyes do spiders have?

(3) What does the female black widow spider do after having sex?

(4) Insects get stuck to a spider's web. Why doesn't the web get stuck to the spider?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 6 April 2007

This week’s subject is elections.

(1) Where did Mick Gallagher, former Hornsby (Sydney) mayor and independent candidate for last month's New South Wales (Australia) election, spend the morning of polling day? (a) in bed (b) visiting every polling booth in the electorate (c) in a police cell

(2) How many of the following were political parties contesting the (1999) NSW election? Gay and Lesbian Party, Make Billionaires Pay More Tax!, No Nuclear Waste Dumps Party, Re-elect Ivan Peich People’s Envoy, Animal Liberation Party, Four Wheel Drive Party, Women's Party, Abolish State Governments, Mick Gallagher for Australia, Outside Newcastle Sydney and Wollongong Party, Stop The Banks Ripping Us Off, What's Doing? Party, Sack Them All, Timbarra Clean Water Party, Give Criminals Longer Sentences, Three Day Weekend Party, Marijuana Smokers Rights Party

(3) What political right do 15-year-olds have in Iran that they don’t have in Australia?

(4) What was the first country to give women the right to vote? (a) England (b) USA (c) New Zealand

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 30 March 2007

This week’s subject is alcohol around the world.

(1) How many litres of beer does the average person in India drink in a week? (a) less than one (b) 5 (c) 12

(2) What is unusual about the way the English drink their beer?

(3) In what month is Germany’s Oktoberfest?

(4) Cognac is associated with which French town?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 23 March 2007

This week’s subject is marriage around the world.

(1) What have ethnic minorities in Romania not been allowed to do when they remarry? (a) drink alcohol (b) use their own language (c) work in executive government positions

(2) How many brothers and sisters does King Mswati III, ruler of Swaziland, have? (a) 10 (b) 100 (c) 600

(3) Sean Stewart was a heavy smoker and drinker, and his de facto was soon to have his child. What made him unusual for a British person? (a) he was a health worker (b) his age (c) he is blind and deaf

(4) Iranian Yar-Mohammad divorced his bride, Shirin, after only two months of marriage. What was the average age of the two? (a) 5.5 (b) 55 (c) 105

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 16 March 2007

This week’s subject is Snail Mail

(1) What shape was the most unusual stamp issued by Tonga? (a) triangular (b) circular (c) banana

(2) What Sydney GPO box number did Singapore Airlines proudly obtain? (a) 000 (b) 999 (c) 747

(3) How was the first air mail sent? (a) by air (b) by train (c) by sea

(4) How many two-cent stamps are there in a dozen?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 9 March 2007

This week’s subject is the internet.

(1) Who owns the internet?

(2) Who invented the internet?

(3) Which site scored highest on Internet company Altodigital’s world survey of the most boring web sites? (a) guide to the world’s finest electricity pylons (b) picture library of Ukrainian bus shelters (c) Traffic Cone Preservation Society

(4) What is on the site www.purple.com?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 2 March 2007

This week’s subject is water.

(1) What was top in two poll results released in mid-February on what voters consider the most important matters for approaching elections?

(2) One of the boats in which Bass and Flinders explored the Australian coastline was named "Tom Thumb". What was their other boat called?

(3) “The World” has 110 apartments (priced from $US2.25 million to $US7.5 million), 88 luxury hotel rooms, four restaurants, spa, gym, nightclub, casino, library, swimming pools and tennis court. Where is it?

(4) Why is the basilisk lizard in Central America known as the "Jesus Christ lizard"?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 23 February 2007

This week's subject is the names of capital cities

(1) What is the capital of Singapore?

(2) What does the name Seoul, the South Korean capital, mean?

(3) What is the name of the capital of Nauru, the world's smallest republic?

(4) What letters are missing from the name of the capital of Mongolia, Ul**nb**t*r?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 16 February 2007

This week’s subject is world diseases and illnesses.

(1) What is the number one killer in Africa? (a) AIDS (b) lions (c) mosquitoes

(2) Why does the human body not develop immunity from the common cold?

(3) What is considered rude behaviour in South Korea? (a) blowing your nose in a public place (b) eating before drinking (c) wearing sunscreen in winter

(4) What is the only human disease ever officially declared eradicated?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 9 February 2007

Lighning is this week’s subject.

(1) What happened to the Jefferson, Louisiana, tomb of cowboy star Buck Taylor, who was killed by lightning?

(2) What causes more deaths—lightning strikes or kicks from donkeys?

(3) Park ranger Roy Sullivan of Virginia, USA, was struck by lightning a record seven times. How did he die?

(4) According to Professor Walter Connor, of the University of Michigan, are men more likely than women to be struck by lightning?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 2 February 2007

This week’s subject is telephones around the world.

(1) To the nearest 50, how many phones are there per 1 000 people in Niger?

(2) What is unique about Iceland telephone directories? (a) They are printed on luminous paper so they can be read more easily during the 24 hour darkness in winter. (b) As no town in the country has more than 25 telephones, the directories are never more than a single sheet of paper. (c) Entries are listed alphabetically according to first names, not surnames.

(3) The Norfolk Island telephone directory is full of Bounty mutineers’ family names, such as Christian, Adams, Quintal and McCoy. How are those with the same surname distinguished from each other? (a) by initials, as in normal telephone books (b) by age (c) by their nicknames, such as “Lettuce Leaf”, “Boof”, Spuddy”, “Diddles” and “Rubber Duck”

(4) Barry Maunder of Twickenham, UK, had a phone number one digit different from that of an internationally-known company. Worse still, phone books in Japan, USA, Colombia and the UK mistakenly listed his number instead of the company. He received 11,000 wrong calls, a record considered for the Guinness Book of Records. What is the company?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 26 January 2007

The Australian Open tennis championships is in its second week. This “grand slam” event is this week’s subject.

(1) What contestant in the Australian women’s singles this month has a two-letter surname?

(2) Ken Rosewall became the youngest winner of the Australian men’s singles at 18 in 1953. Who is the oldest winner of this title?

(3) How did both Mark Edmonson and Vita Gerulaitis win the Australian Open Men’s Singles in 1977?

(4) When did an Australian last win his country’s singles title?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 19 January 2007

Following Australia’s 5-0 win over England in the test series that ended this month, we look at cricket this week.

(1) The day after it finished on 5 January 2007, how many pages did Sydney’s Daily Telegraph devote to the fifth test against England, which was the final test for Glenn McGrath, Shane Warne and Justin Lange? (a) 7 (b) 14 (c) 26

(2) How many years earlier was the previous 5-0 result for Australia v England cricket tests? (a) it had never happened before (b) 43 (c) 86

(3) In how many consecutive innings did India’s Ajit Agarkar get out first ball when playing against Australia in December 1999-January 2000?

(4) How many of the 42 tests that Bert Sutcliffe played for New Zealand did New Zealand win?

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 12 January 2007

President Sapamurat Niyazov died last month; this week’s subject is about him and his country, Turkmenistan.

(1) In the decade before his death, did President Niyazov’s hair colour change from black to grey or grey to black?

(2) What types of recorded music are allowed in public places and on radio and TV in Turkmenistan? (a) any type, as long as it is not loud (b) classical only (c) no recorded music is allowed

(3) What direction does the huge gilded statue of President Niyazov in Turkmenistan’s capital face? (a) NNE (b) SSW (c) the sun

(4) Which of the following apply in Turkmenistan? (a) a holiday in honour of melons (b) January is named after President Niyazov (c) April is named after President Niyazov’s mother (d) wearing of make-up by newsreaders is banned

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Trivia Quiz: Questions for week ending 5 January 2007

This week’s subject is world cities.

(1) The Falls Church voted last month to break away from the US Episcopal Church. The Falls Church is in what city?

(2) Of what two cities is “nylon” an abbreviation?

(3) In what city is Karl Marx, the founder of communism, buried?

(4) Of the 10 largest cities in population 100 years ago, how many are still in the top 10?

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Trivia Collection

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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