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Free TRIVIA ANSWERS for 2004

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 31 December 2004

(1) Cameron’s Corner is the point where the Australia’s New South Wales, Queensland and South Australian state borders meet. The residents can welcome in the New Year at midnight New South Wales summer time, cross the border to see the new year in again half-an-hour later on South Australian summer time and a further half hour later in Queensland, which stays on standard time all year. (The question was: "How are the people living near Cameron’s Corner (in the Australian state New South Wales) able to welcome in each New Year three times?")

(2) Seven thousand police were on duty in Times Square, New York, on New Year’s Eve, 1999.

(3) The first baby to be born after midnight on New Year’s Eve is more likely to be male, and similarly for whatever the day and time. The ratio of male to female babies is 105:100.

(4) An anagram of “a year to shut down” is “year two thousand” . (The question was: "New Year’s Day of what year was expected to see computers crash because of the millennium bug? The answer is an anagram of “A year to shut down” (4, 3, 8) ")

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 24 December 2004

Answers to last week’s Christmas trivia:

(1) The present appearance of Santa Claus was largely originated by an artist employed by Coca-Cola.

(2) On Christmas Day, 1914, German and British soldiers held an impromptu truce across their enemy lines to shake hands, exchange gifts and play soccer for 24 hours, then went back to shooting each other.

(3) Good King Wenceslas wasn’t a good king. He wasn’t even a king, only a duke. (Sydney Daily Telegraph 25-12-03)

(4) An anagram of “Starry hype. Many wrap merchandise” is “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 17 December 2004

(1) The special rooms that Iran Air planes have between the toilets and the first-class lounge are prayer rooms for Muslims.

(2) The airline that deliberately misspells its name in Australian telephone directories is Qantas. It has an entry under Quantas, as we always expect a “q” to be followed by a “u”.

(3) The passenger capacity of the aircraft Laima, which set an Atlantic crossing record on 21 August 1998, was nil. It was the smallest aircraft to cross the Atlantic, with a wingspan of 3m and a weight of 13kg including 5kg of fuel.

(4) “I land earliest” is an anagram of Delta Airlines.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 10 December 2004

(1) Most Cook Islanders live in New Zealand. Only 19 000 of them live in the Cook Islands, compared with 40 000 in New Zealand; 10 000 live in Australia. (Question was: "Where do most Cook Islands nationals live?")

(2) The Canary Islands are named after animals. The Latin name was Insularia Canaria, meaning Islands of Dogs.

(3) There are 363 sheep per person in the Falkland Islands.

(4) The anagram of “bends under capitalist force” (5, 9, 5, 6) is “Cuban President Fidel Castro”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 3 December 2004

(1) Rain last fell in Antarctica’s “Dry Valleys” several million years ago, so (b) (more than a year ago) was the correct answer. (Question was: "When did rain last fall in Antarctica's "Dry Valleys"? (a) probably this week, as a day without rain there is rare (b) more than a year ago (c) approximately 20 years ago"

(2) It has never been known to rain in Chile’s Calama. (Absolute Trivia).

(3) Clouds fly higher during the day than in the night. (Absolute Trivia)

(4) The country’s name that is an anagram of “battering IRA” is Great Britain.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 26 November 2004

(1) The only two countries that are doubly landlocked (ie they have no access to the sea, and neither do the country or countries that surround them) are Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan.

(2) The official name of North Korea is the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea

(3) The world’s most-discussed topic, and our topic for this week, is the weather.

(4) The US city’s name that is an anagram of wanker is Newark.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 19 November 2004

(1) Rock Reef Pass, Everglades, Florida, USA, claims to be the world’s lowest pass. It is two metres high. (Question was: "How high is the world's lowest pass? (a) less than 500 metres (b) about 50 metres (c) more than 1000 metres")

(2) The world’s longest mountain range, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is rarely seen because it is under water. (Question was: "Why is most of the world's longest mountain range rarely seen?")

(3) All 10 of the USA’s highest mountains are in Alaska. (Question was: "All 10 of the USA's highest mountains are in the same state. Which state is this?")

(4) The anagram of “Ultra Asia” is “Australia”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 12 November 2004

Answers to last week’s questions on travelling by air:

(1) The name of the 747 with the longer top deck was originally the "stretched upper deck" or "SUD" version. Why was this name changed to "extended upper deck"?
"SUD" is the medical acronym for "sudden unexplained death".

(2) How many people are in the air right now? (a) more than 5000 (b) about 35 000 (c) more than 60 000. The correct answers are (a) and (c). The are more than one million in the air at any given time.

(3) Jean Pilâtre became the first man to fly when he soared over Paris in a balloon. What other flying record did he set? He was the first to be killed in a flying accident. (“Can Elephants Swim?”)

(4) On a flight across America in 1976 a hijacker drew a gun and took the stewardess hostage, saying "Take me to Detroit." Until he took over the plane, what was its destination? Detroit. After the stewardess said "We're already going to Detroit," the hijacker said "Oh, good" and returned to his seat.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 5 November 2004

Last week’s questions were on travel by water.

(1) Question was: "If a plane flies from above the Atlantic Ocean to above the Pacific Ocean it flies from east to west. But if a ship sails from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean via the Panama Canal it sails through the canal from west to east. How can this be?"
Answer: It is best to look at a map. The country Panama runs almost east-west. It joins North America at its western end and South America at its eastern end. The Panama Canal cuts the country from northwest to south east. Shipping from the east does almost a U-turn as it enters the canal at the northwest end and the reverse as it exits.

(2) Question was: "Why is the most common dimension for large ships at or just under 305m long by 33.5m wide?"
Answer: Those are the maximum dimensions for a ship to pass through the Panama Canal. (Lonely Planet’s Central America)

(3) No ships can berth at Norfolk Island in the Pacific Ocean—they must anchor 200m off-shore. Cars are transferred ashore by rowing boat (on two whale-boats).

(4) Question was: "The Intermarine Company on the River Magra at Ameglia, Italy, secured an $8 million contract in 1981 to build a minesweeper and three military launches for the Malaysian government. Why were the four vessels completed but not delivered?"
Answer: It was only after the huge craft were completed that the builders recalled the Colombiera Bridge spanned the river between their shipyards and the sea, and that none of the vessels could pass under it. (Return of Heroic Failures)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 October 2004

For three of last week’s trivia questions on travel by road we used the Guinness Book of Records.

(1) There are 66 traffic lanes at the junction of highways 5, 22 and 27 in Orange County.

(2) You would have been wise to select a number less than 66 for the number of traffic lanes that Italy’s Vicolo della Virilita boasts. It has one lane only. That is 43cm wide, the world's narrowest street.

(3) No major towns are linked to Papua New Guinea’s capital, Port Moresby, by road. You can fly, go by sea or walk.

(4) How long would it take to stroll down to a friend's place at the other end of Yonge Street, Toronto? (a) about two minutes (b) over an hour (c) a month or more. Two of those answers are correct, namely (b) and (c). It would take you two months, if you strolled for 30km a day. Yonge Street is 1896km long.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 October 2004

Answers to last week’s questions about country borders:

(1) Fifteen countries share a border with China.

(2) These countries are Mongolia, Russia, North Korea, Macau, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, India, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan.

(3) Five of those names end in the same four letters, namely “stan”.

(4) The name of the world’s most heavily militarised border is the DMZ – Demilitarised Zone – between North and South Korea.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 October 2004

Answers to last week’s questions about cities:

(1) The world’s quietest city is Venice, thanks to being car-free.

(2) Ethiopia's holy city, Axum, was linked to southern Arabia by caravan routes via its port, Adulis. Why would tourists now have some difficulty visiting Adulis? Because it is buried.

(3) The principal city in the Gaza Strip is Gaza.

(4) In the Mercer Human Resource Consulting’s quality of life surveys for both 2002 and 2003, the name of the city that finished first starts with the last letter of the alphabet. It’s Zurich.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 October 2004

1) What is the only continent on which corn is not grown?

(2) Which continent has the highest average elevation?

(3) Which is the driest continent?

(4) Which is the windiest continent?

The answer to each question is the same: Antarctica.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 October 2004

Answers to last week’s questions on continents:

(1) Istanbul, in Turkey, is on two continents – part in Europe and part in Asia. (Question was: What city is on two continents?)

(2) One of the 54 African countries, Liberia, has not been ruled by a foreign power. (Book of Answers.) (Question was: Of the 54 countries that make up the African continent, how many have not been ruled by a foreign power?)

(3) Only one continent—Antarctica —has no land below sea level.

(4) The unusual spelling feature common to the names of every continent (taking North and South America as America) is its first letter is the same as its last.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 24 September 2004

Answers to last week’s questions on waterfalls:

(1) Each second in a very wet season, 13 million litres of water flows over Iguazu Falls.

(2) In a very dry season, the flow is zero.

(3) The Guaira Falls, on the Parana River between Paraguay and Brazil, are no longer the world’s largest waterfall because they are now under water. This follows the completion 20 years ago of the Itaipu Dam. (Reader's Digest Book of Facts)

(4) A famous North American landmark that is constantly moving backwards is Niagara Falls.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 17 September 2004

(1) What do Baku, Bandar Seri Begawan, Ouagadougo, Bujumbura, Nuuk, Tegucigalpa, Nidjamena Yamoussoukra, Antananarivo and Paramaribo have in common? They are all capital cities (of Azerbaijan, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Greenland, Honduras, Ivory Coast, Madagascar and Surinam).

(2) The name Harare, capital of Zimbabwe, means “you never sleep”. (The question was: "What does the name Harare, capital of Zimbabwe, mean? (a) meeting place of the tribes (b) you never sleep (c) boil your carrots in the wet season")

(3) The most southerly capital city is Wellington, New Zealand.

(4) The most northerly capital city is Reyjavik, Iceland.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 10 September 2004

(1) The Olympic flame crossed the equator on 25 May 2000 for the first time since 1956.

(2) Of the Brunei delegation to the 1988 Olympic Games, 100% were officials. Brunei sent one official and no athletes. The official participated in the march past at the opening ceremony.

(3) Equestrian events are the most dangerous in the Olympic Games.

(4) The five Olympic rings represent each continent and at least one of the colours is found on the flag of each country represented. (Question was: "What do the number and colours of the Olympic rings represent?")

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 3 September 2004

1) Besides being the names of Olympic Games cities, Amsterdam, Athens, Atlanta, Berlin and Rome are also cities in the American state of Georgia.

(2) The only city to have been awarded the summer Olympics three times is Athens.

(3) The smallest country in size and population to have hosted a modern Olympics is Greece.

(4) This year’s Olympic Games marathon events started in Marathon.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 27 August 2004

(1) The country with more fresh water than any other is Canada.

(2) Monaco has the world’s shortest coastline. (The question was "What country has the shortest coastline, a grand total of three kilometres? If you’d like a clue, it’s in Europe.")

(3) 75% of the world’s fresh water is stored as ice.

(4) When we asked last week for the name of the world’s highest lake, we suggested this question was impossible. And it is. According to the Guinness Book of Records, this lake has no name. It’s in Tibet.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 20 August 2004

(1) The country with the most emigrants is Mexico.

(2) The world’s highest country, when defined as the country with the highest lowest point, is Lesotho.

(3) The largest former British colony is the USA.

(4) Mongolia used to be the world’s largest land-locked country. It has not changed in size, but has lost its title to Kazakhstan since the demise of the USSR.

If you knew the answer to just one of those questions, you deserve a high distinction.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 13 August 2004

(1) The only human-eating creature known to have inhabited a Pacific island is man.

(2) The island off Cape York where Captain Cook claimed possession of Australia’s east coast in 1770 is Possession Island.

(3) Assuming you could ascend at a rate of five metres a minute, the time it would take you to climb to the equivalent of the highest point on the Ashmore and Cartier Islands is half a minute. Their summit is 2.4 metres above sea level. (Question was: " Assuming you could ascend at a rate of five metres a minute, approximately how long would it take to climb to the equivalent of the highest point on the Ashmore and Cartier Islands? ".)

(4) No country owns Tory Island off the north-west coast of Northern Ireland. It is an independent kingdom.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 6 August 2004

1) Our site visitor from Iran would have known that it was previously called Persia and before that it was Iran.

(2) The small republic surrounded by Italy is Communal Democratic Implementation Republic of the Italian People’s Independent Movement of San Marino.
(The question was: " A small republic surrounded by Italy basks under the full name of Communal Democratic Implementation Republic of the Italian People’s Independent Movement of … . The … represents two words by which it is most commonly known. What are these two words?")

(3) Twelve of the 14 countries (or 13 of 15 if we count “America”) that begin with the letter”a” also end with “a”. The two that don’t conform are Afghanistan and Azerbaijan. The others are Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia and Austria. Three of the four US states beginning with “a” also end in “a” (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas).

(4) After gaining independence from Britain, Gambia changed its name to The Gambia.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 July 2004

(1) The world’s shortest town name is Å.

(2) There are 85 letters in the world’s longest place name. I would type it for you here, except that I have other commitments. It’s in New Zealand.

(3) The London suburb Knightsbridge name has a record six consecutive consonants.

(4) The town that most Alabama residents call “brilliant” is Brilliant. Brilliant!

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 July 2004

(1) Some Norwegian houses still have grass growing on their roofs to assist insulation. (Question was : "Why do some people in northern Norway regularly water their roofs?")

(2) When Olav V was 36th in line of succession to the British throne in the 1980s he was already king—king of Norway. (Question was : "Olav V was 36th in line of succession to the British throne in the 1980s. What were his chances of being king?)

(3) Besides being first names of people, ALF and EVE are the airport codes for the Norwegian airport Alfa and Evenes. And if you’re into airport codes that are people’s names, here are some more: ABE, BUD, BOB, JOE, MIA, DAN and FLO. (Question was: Besides being familiar first names, you could see ALF and EVE printed many times as you tour Norway by air. Why is this?)

(4) The furthest north you can travel to by car is North Cape, Norway

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 July 2004

(1) Faulconbridge, a town in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, has the longest town name in the English language without a letter repeated. It also has half the letters of the alphabet and all the vowels. (Question was: "What is special about the Blue Mountains town name Faulconbridge?")

(2) What is significant about the spelling of the Victorian town names Colignan and Nangiloc? Each is the reverse of the other.

(3) Quaama is a town near Bega, on the south coast of the Australian state New South Wales.

(4) Zanthus, Zillmere, Zilzie and Zuytdorp are all Australian towns.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 July 2004

Trivia questions were about capital cities:

(1) Burkina Faso’s capital city’s name, Ouagadougou, has eight vowels but only three consonants.

(2) Vatican City has no restaurants or bars. You may know of other such cities.

(3) The capital city of Latvia, Riga, was the largest city in Sweden in 1630. Latvia has had the honour of being ruled by and thus part of Germany, Denmark, Poland, Sweden and Russia. (The trivia question was "In 1630, Riga, present capital of Latvia, was the largest city in where? (a) Russia (b) Germany (c) Sweden")

(4) Brasilia is the South American capital city laid out in the shape of a plane.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 July 2004

(1) What is a wat? In Thailand, it’s a Buddhist temple.

(2) If you plead guilty to drug charges in Thailand, your sentence can be halved. If it were a life sentence, it gets “halved” to 50 years.

(3) Krungthep Maha Nakorn, Amarn Rattanakosindra, Mahindrayudha, Mahadilokpop Noparatana Rajdhani Mahasathan, Amorn Piman Avatarn Satit, Sakkatultiya Vishnukarn Prasit is the official name for the capital city of Thailand, Bangkok.

(4) After having been published since 1831, The Sydney Morning Herald put news on its front page for the first time in April 1944. Until then, the front page carried classified advertisements. (The question was "What did The Sydney Morning Herald put on its front page for the first time in April 1944, after having been published since 1831?")

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 June 2004

(1) It is grammatically correct to say “we is” when you announce that We is a town on the Indonesian island Pulau. Another possibility is to state that “we” is a pronoun.

(2) The flags of Indonesia and Monaco are identical.

(3) The first American consumer product to be sold in Russia was Pepsi-Cola.

(4) The most expensive property on the Monopoly board is “Boardwalk” in the US version and Mayfair in the British.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 June 2004

(1) If you add the word “Hill” or “Hills” to Baulkham, Box, Castle, Mays, McGraths, Quakers, Rouse or Seven you get the name of a Sydney suburb.

(2) The two forms of transport you would use to get from Orlando, Florida, to the Sea of Tranquillity are car and space vehicle. The Sea of Tranquility is on the moon. (The question was "What two forms of transport would you use to get from Orlando, Florida, to the Sea of Tranquillity?")

(3) The smallest number of colours needed for a world map so that no adjoining countries are the same colour is four.

(4) The name of the stretch of land separating North and South Korea is the Demilitarised Zone. This is incongruous because it is the world’s most heavily militartised border. (The question was "What is incongruous about the name of the world’s most heavily militarised border?")

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 June 2004

(1) The name of the Sydney suburb Lilli Pilli means “tree with little edible berries”.

(2) The world’s quietest city is Venice. Plenty of people but no road traffic.

(3) The two cities that are least likely to be visited by 99% of the Australian population are Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. (The question was "What two cities (in the one country) are least likely to be visited by 99% of the Australian population?" About 1% of the Australian population is Muslim and only Muslims can visit Mecca and Medina.)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 June 2004

(1) India’s flag contains a picture of a wheel.

(2) The country Lesotho is completely surrounded by South Africa.

(3) Of the Sydney suburb names that have a compass direction as the first word, eg North Strathfield, there are more “Norths” than all the “Easts”, “Souths” and “Wests” combined (North has 20, East 6, South 8 and West 4).

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 May 2004

(1) The Sydney Harbour Bridge is the world’s widest largest-scale and heaviest single arch bridge.

(2) The Sydney suburb named after a main meal is Breakfast Point.

(3) On our home page Alan appears to be getting a drink from a mural in Hillsdale.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 May 2004

(1) Australian stockbroker Rene Rivkin has sold 100 of his cars; some of the remaining five may have to go too.

(2) In the northern Sydney suburb of Warrawee you can turn left into Eulbertie Avenue then left out of it into Eulbertie Avenue because Eulbertie Avenue comes to a T-intersection where the cross street in both directions bears the same name. (See photo under North | Warrawee.)

(3) The “trouble-decker” that serves Sydenham (click on “South) on most Sundays is an Atlantean bus from the bus museum. It earned its nickname by causing lengthy strikes when the government tried to introduce one-man double-decker operation. Some clever people noticed that the question had twelve consecutive words beginning with “s”. [The question had been: “trouble-decker” of Sydney serves Sydenham (southern Sydney suburb) some Sundays. So, see Suburbs/South for what is it?]

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 May 2004

(1) The Sydney suburb’s name with eight vowels, all the same vowel, is Woolloomooloo.

(2) Most of the streets in Castlecrag have names beginning with “The”.

(3) Warrawee is an Aboriginal word meaning “stop here”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 May 2004

(1) In the original Watsons Bay lighthouse picture (now replaced) two photos were joined together. One of them was taken from a higher position on the ground behind the lighthouse.

(2) What do Clare, Dacey, Erskine, Forest, Glades, Gran, Hammond, Hurst, Kelly, Matra, Oak, Orange, Regent, Rose, Schey, Varro and Wentworth have in common? They all have “ville” as their suffix for the name of a Sydney suburb.

(3) Zetland is Sydney’s last suburb alphabetically.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 April 2004

(1) Over 90% of overseas arrivals settling in Blacktown in the first half of the last decade were from non-English-speaking countries.

(2) Alan ran into former Anglican Church head Sir Marcus Loane while walking in Warrawee on 21 April.

(3) You can’t match (or at least we hope you won’t try to match) Alan’s feat of doing a particular two-kilometre walk in Wolli Creek because it was through the tunnel of the Sydney Airport railway line before it was opened to trains.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 April 2004

(1) Two Sydney suburb names beginning with “The” are The Rocks and The Spit.

(2) Mount Trefle is in Nielsen Park, Vaucluse, a neighbouring suburb of Watsons Bay. Justin of Canberra reported that the “mountain” is 47.7 metres high and named after a former Minister for Lands from 1912-15.

(3) The suburb name with “a” as every second letter is Tamarama.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 April 2004

(1) The streets featured in Sydney’s Sunday Telegraph appeared under the heading Sydney’s Best Streets”.

(2) Kirribilli Avenue, Kirribilli, is home to Prime Minister John Howard.

(3) Lachlan Murdoch sold his house in Billyard Avenue, Kirribilli, to Russell Crowe.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 April 2004

(1) There were 131 candidates for the City of Rockdale local government elections on 27 March.

(2) The name of the lookout on the Pacific Highway at Turramurra is "The Lookout".

(3) The nearest car ferry to the centre of Sydney is only 10km away at Mortlake.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 April 2004

(1) Ms Forrest has the ideal surname for a Greens party candidate.

(2) South Wentworthville is the longest Sydney suburb name.

(3) Ian Thorpe has bought a home in Burraneer.


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Trivia Collection

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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