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Free TRIVIA ANSWERS for 2011

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014 and at Free Trivia Questions 2015 and at Free Trivia Questions 2016 and at Free Trivia Questions 2017

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 December 2011

Answers to last week's questions on the new year.

1. On 31 December 1956 compere Brian Henderson ecstatically told the audience for the first long-distance outside telecast by Sydney's Channel 9 that he had just been informed a good picture was being received at the station. The picture was coming from Katoomba, 100 kilometres away. It was a telecast of Katoomba's New Year's Eve revels.

2. New Year's Eve and New Year's Day last fell in the same year this year, and every year before.

3. The religious group, the Assemblies of Yahweh, determines the start of the new year by having its head fly from Pennsylvania to Israel to check for green ears of barley.

4. If you aren't wished a 'happy new year', you'll probably be wished a 'prosperous new year', but 'happy' wins by about 10 to one.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 December 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Christmas:

1. Romanian dicator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife were executed on Christmas Day 1989

2. A Noel is a Christmas?

3. An anagram of Santa is Satan

4. An anagram of 'He's fat, smart, rich' is 'Father Christmas'

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 December 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Google:

1. The third most popular overall search on Google in 2011 was Google. (Sydney Morning Herald)

2. A Googlewhackblatt is a word that, when entered into the Google search engine, produces exactly one hit. Examples were controversify,.Execulantizator and Grampulator. (Sydney Morning Herald)
Just giving those examples in media stories about the words naturally made them extinct as examples.

3. If you Google 'the', you get 25,270,000,000 options (as at 7 December 2011). A year ago it was 13,500,000,000.

4. Had you started checking each Google option for 'the' a year ago, and done one every six seconds without any time off, you would have completed one of your required 2600 years.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 December 2011

Answers to last week's questions on police.

1. Several thousand angry demonstrators took to the streets to demonstrate outside Sydney's Parliament House in November. There not even one arrest because the demonstrators were police.

2. Sydney police used the friendly term 'mate' when addressing an offender who assaulted police, causing one to have a dislocated shoulder, on 13 August 2004, because the offender's name was Mate Posa. (Sun-Herald)

3. It is difficult for a police officer in the Pacific state Niue to get a promotion to a supervisory position because the state only has one police officer.

4. J Edgar Hoover was director of the FBI for 48 years. (Book of Answers)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 December 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Antarctica:

1. When Douglas Mawson struggled back to his hut in Antarctica on 8 February 1913 after a failed three-month attempt to reach the South Pole, he learned that he had missed his ship that would have returned him to Australia by only a few hours. He had to wait until the following year for the next ship.

2. The continent of Australia has one country; Antarctica has none.

3. There is a Rome (or Roma) on every continent except Antarctica, so if you answered that question incorrectly, you are rather special.

4. Robert Schumann and his bike flew to within a short distance of the south pole; he then rode the final bit.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 November 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Australian phone numbers:

1. Is the phone number for emergencies 000 or 112? Yes.

2. The 7 TV Network has the Sydney phone number 8777 7777 and address PO Box 777, Pyrmont.

3. The 10 TV Network's Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth phone numbers all end in 1010 and its text number ends in 101010.

4. The phone number for the ACER Arena at Sydney's Olympic Park is 87654321.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 November 2011

Answers to last week's questions on President Obama:

1. The solution to the crossword clue: 'Freezing American president (5)' is Obama. (BA and MA are degrees, so his surname reads 0 degrees, which is freezing. )

2. After taking the oath, President Obama said that 'forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath'. But only 43 had. Why was this? President Cleveland, the 22nd and 24th president, served two separate terms either side of President Harrison. (Sydney Morning Herald)

3. Presidents Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, George H W Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama (but not George W Bush) were all left-handed, an extraordinary sequence as only one in 10 people are left-handed.

4. Barack Obama's middle name is Hussein.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 November 2011

Answers to last week's questions on ones:

1. At 11 seconds after 11.11am on 11 November 2011, a digital clock read 111111111111. How long did we have to wait before something like that appeared again? Twelve hours.

2. The simplest way to change 111,111,111 into 12,345,678,987,654,321 is to multiply it by itself.

3. In the 1999 Wimbledon championships (including qualifying rounds), Victorian Wayne Arthurs won 111 consecutive service games.

4. If you type 1 fifty times (111111 etc) in a Google search, you get over 700,000 responses.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 November 2011

Answers to last week's questions on horse racing:

1. In the 1890s, G. Gee was prominent in horse racing. He was a jockey who rode at Warwick Farm. (Sydney Morning Herald)

2. 'The race that stops the nation' is used repeatedly in the Australian media on the day before and on Melbourne Cup day.

3. Sisters Kathy and Tracy both rode in the same race at Gosford on 29 December 2005 and finished in a dead-heat for first.

4. NSW Gaming and Racing Minister Grant McBride and his successor, Graham West, were non-gamblers and non-drinkers. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 October 2011

Answers to last week's questions on marathon running:

1. Fauja Singh at aged 100 became the first centenarian to complete a marathon in this year's Toronto event.

2. Pheidippides, a Greek soldier, is said to have run the first marathon from the town Marathon.

3. All of the North Pole Marathon, Santa Claus Marathon, Antarctic Ice Marathon and Sahara Marathon are annual events. The Santa Claus Marathon is run in Finland.

4. Most marathon events provide water at intervals of 2½ kilometres and sports drinks each 5 kilometres. Bordeaux's Le Marathon du Medoc refreshment stations offer liqueurs, ham and cheese. The winner receives his/her weight in bottles of wine (ie 80kg = 80 bottles). Red Cross medical staff treat victims of heat-stroke and over-indulgence. (Sydney Morning Herald).

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 October 2011

1. For his 2½ years as CEO of Apple to January 2000, Steve Jobs was given a bonus of a Gulfstream V jet and more than $1.5 billion worth of Apple options. (Sydney Morning Herald )

2. 'Pod' is an acronym of 'Playable On Demand'.

3. The poison in apple pips and apricot kernels is cyanide. (University of Sydney diary)

4. An apple connects Adam, Isaac Newton and William Tell.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 October 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Queen Elizabeth II:

1. When news came through of the death of her father, King George VI, the then Princess Elizabeth was up a tree. She was in Kenya, where her accommodation was a tree-house.

2. The second day of June was selected for Queen Elizabeth II's 1953 coronation because meteorologists said it was the most consistently sunny day in the calendar. It rained.

3. For her 2000 Australian Royal tour, 50 pairs of gloves were included in the Queen's luggage. (Sydney Morning Herald)

4. In October 2008, Queen Elizabeth was seen wearing the same red outfit that she wore in April. What is significant about that? Etiquette normally requires that the queen never wears the same outfit twice. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 October 2011


Answers to last week's questions on AFL football:

1. The distance between goalposts in the first AFL match was 805 metres. (Winning at Trivial Pursuit)

2. Peter FitzSimons wrote in his newspaper column on the morning of last year's AFL grand final: "In this column, this year, I have consistently backed the WRONG side to win in every contest I have addressed my attention to! I'm talking: World Cup soccer matches, NRL games, Origins, Bledisloe Tests, key AFL clashes, you name it. Wrong every time! Last week, shattered, I finally gave up my predictions and wimped out, by writing of the AFL grand final: 'St Kilda/ Collingwood. Whose hard-luck story will continue today? Whose will end? The only thing for sure is that one will actually win!'" What was the result of that match? Neither team won. It was a 68-all draw, the first tied grand final since 1977.

3. St Kilda last won an AFL grand final in 1966. How close have they been since? They failed to win three consecutive grand finals, one in 2009 and two in 2010 (the first being drawn).

4. Collingwood's Mick Malthouse had his 664th match as a senior coach at this year's grand final.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 September 2011

Answers to last week's questions on rugby league:

1. St George won the Sydney rugby league premiership every year from 1956 to 1966.

2. Manly utility back David Liddlard pulled a back muscle while brushing his teeth.

3. The most widely-known member of the South Sydney Football Club is Oprah Winfrey.

4. Will Hopoate turned down a million-dollar contract for two years to be a Mormon missionary.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 September 2011

Answers to last week's questions on national flags:

1. Until August 2011, the Libyan flag was all green.

2. Greenland's flag is a rectangle with a white top half and red bottom half, containing a circle with a red top half and white bottom half.

3. Switzerland and Vatican State are the only two countries with a square flag.

4. Nepal is the only country with a flag that is not rectangular or square. Its flag is two slightly-overlapping triangles.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 September 2011

Answers to last week's questions on rugby union:

1. No tries were scored in the 2007 World Cup final.

2. The name of the former English international winger that is also the name of a car make and model is Austin Healey.

3. The Uruguayan rugby players who survived for 72 days in the Andes after the crash of their plane in 1972 ate the flesh of their dead team mates to stay alive.

4. The 15 members of the Mombasa Rugby Football Club flew 760km to Uganda in 1974 for their annual needle match against the Harlequins. Where were the Harlequins and what were they doing while the Mombasa players were in flight? They were 30,000 feet below them travelling in a fleet of cars to Mombasa. (Return of Heroic Failures)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 September 2011

Answers to last week's questions on terrorism:

1. What happened on these famous dates (and why are they easily remembered)? (a) 7 December, 1941 (b) 14 February 1966 (c) 11 September, 2001
(a) The Japanese attacked Pearl Harbour (speech by President Roosevelt) (b) decimal currency was introduced in Australia (advertising jingle) (c) terrorists crashed planes into New York and Washington (constant news references, eg 'September 11' mentioned 17 times in The Sydney Morning Herald and 19 in the Daily Telegraph of 14 November 2001, mainly in reference to an unrelated plane crash, and 66 times in the November 2001 Philadelphia Trumpet)

2. The word that BBC newsreaders were prohibited from using by the deputy news editor in November 2001 to describe terrorists was 'terrorists'.

3. British couple Jason and Jenny Cairns-Lawrence, from Dudley, near Birmingham, were in New York on 11 September 2001, when hijacked planes crashed into the twin towers and brought them down, killing about 3000 people; London on 7 July 2005 when four terrorists used suicide bombs to blow up trains and buses, killing 52; and in central Mumbai on 26 November 2008 as terrorists targeted foreigners during a killing spree which paralysed the city with fear. (London Telegraph, which said that they are either the world's luckiest or unluckiest tourists)

4. By changing one letter in the first name of Osama (bin Laden) you get the surname of President Obama who ordered the mission that killed him.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 September 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Israel:

1. Israel is considering moving its weekend from Friday/Saturday to Saturday/Sunday.

2. In Israel, the new day starts at midnight secular time and at sunset the day before for Jewish religious days.

3. Max Dadashvili broke his back in Israel by drinking coffee in a Tel Aviv restaurant when a would-be suicide landed on him from three storeys above. The would-be suicide was uninjured.

4. On 22 January 1996 the lengthy deliberations of an Israeli court were reported around the world. The court was investigating whether a middle-aged male prisoner serving 10 years could have a life-size inflatable doll in his cell.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 26 August 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Berlin:

1. Construction of the Berlin Wall started in August 50 years ago.

2. The Times' list of the top 10 world news stories of the 20th century, in chronological order, was: Sinking of the Lusitania; End of WWI; Wright Brothers' flight; Reichstag fire; Pearl Harbour; Hiroshima; Kennedy assassination; man on the moon; Watergate; fall of the Berlin Wall.

3. For his last 20 years, Nazi war criminal Rudolf Hess was the only inmate of Berlin's Spandau prison. There were 105 staff to run the prison for him.

4. Before the Berlin wall came down and Germany was re-united, it was split into East and West Germany. The plural of 'Germany' is 'Germanys'.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 19 August 2011

Answers to last week's questions on shares:

1. All companies listed with the Australian Stock Exchange were required to submit to the Exchange by 31 March 1999 their plans to deal with the Y2K problem. As it listed itself on the Stock Exchange in 1998, to what organisation was the Australian Stock Exchange required to report? Itself. (Sydney Morning Herald)

2. Using his 'foolproof' method of advanced mathematics and the nous of two Nobel Prize winners for economics, Wall Street legend John Meriwether lost $10 billion for his rich investors in 1998. (Telegraph)

3. Had you purchased $1000 worth of Westfield shares in 1960, they would have been worth $85 million 40 years later. (Telegraph)

4. When the Fifth National Bank and The Third National Bank merged in 1908, the new bank was named The Fifth Third National Bank of Cincinnati. Sixty years later the name was simplified to Fifth Third Bank.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 12 August 2011

Answers to last week's questions on North Korea:

1. North Korea was appointed in June 2011 as chair of the United Nations Conference of Disarmament.

2. The president of North Korea is dead, but he is president for ever.

3. North Korea says that when its present leader was born there was a double rainbow and a new star in the sky. (BBC News)

4. The North Korean president is referred to as the 'Great Leader' and the present chairman as the 'Dear Leader'.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 5 August 2011

Answers to last week's questions on the Tour de France:

1. The final stage of the Tour de France is considered virtually just a procession, as, barring accidents, the leader at the start of that stage almost always wins.

2. In the last 50 years the leader before the final stage of the Tour de France has only been beaten four times, because there is a gentleman's agreement that the leader before the last stage is the winner.

3. Cadel Evans is the first Australian to win the event.

4. The winner of the second Tour de France, in 1904, was disqualified for catching a train for part of the event.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 July 2011

Answers to last week's questions on countries:

1. There are 193 countries.

2. South Sudan became the world's newest country on 9 July.

3. The only country where the sun rises in the Pacific and sets in the Atlantic is Panama. It's best to look at a map, but the middle of the country takes a sharp bend, causing the Gulf of Panama (in the Pacific Ocean) to be east of that section of Panama and the part of the Caribbean Sea (in the Atlantic Ocean) to be west.

4. No countries are south of the Antarctic Circle.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 July 2011

Answers to last week's questions on British newspapers:

1. The News of the World had been published for 168 years.

2. The Commonwealth Sentinel, billed as "Britain's most fearless newspaper", was first published on 6 February 1965 with a print run of 50,000 copies. It closed the following day. The paper's founder said that they forgot to arrange distribution, and to his knowledge only one copy was sold.

3. A former KGB officer purchased the London Evening Standard in January 2009.

4. The London Evening Standard was purchased for one pound in January 2009.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 July 2011

Answers to last week's questions on sport:

1. Charlotte "Lottie" Dod was the youngest Wimbledon tennis singles champion, British golf champion, Olympic archery medallist and an England hockey representative. (Guinness World Records)

2. Three sports in which you have to go backwards to win are backstroke swimming, rowing and tug-of-war. Other possible answers are abseiling and high jump.

3. We could argue that backstroke swimmers don't swim backwards. They swim forwards but upside down. (Against that is that if backstroke is swimming upside down and going forward, then the luge (tobogganing) is lying upside-down and going backwards.) Rowers are also going forward but just facing backwards, and the boat is going forwards. (So does that leave only tug-of-war?) If head-first is forward and feet-first is backwards, then parachuting is a backwards sport. We could also claim that backstrokers swim forwards upside-up. The other strokes are upside-down. (Sydney Morning Herald)

4. Aerialist Tito Gaona's specialty was the quadruple somersault, spinning at 120km/h in mid-air from a flying trapeze 20m above ground. The New York Circus billed it as the most difficult acrobatic feat of the 20th Century. In every night of his nine-month season, Tito failed his attempt. (Book of Heroic Failures)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 July 2011

Answers to last week's questions on the US space shuttle:

1. Mark Shuttleworth was the third space tourist, travelling by shuttle to the International Space Station in 2002.

2. Australian Dr Andy Thomas was accompanied by 1500 creatures, including rodents, insects and fish, into space aboard the Columbia shuttle in 1998. (Signs of the Times)

3. Andy Thomas became Australia's most-travelled man by completing 90 million km in 4½ months on the MIR space station. (Sydney Morning Herald)

4. Editors of Reader's Digest Book of Facts selected the space shuttle as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. The other six were the Taj Mahal, Great Wall of China, Easter Island statues, Eiffel Tower, Mayan city of Tikal and Chartres Cathedral.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 July 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Wimbledon:

1. Venus Williams won the shortest Wimbledon ladies' semi-final for 40 years on 2 July 2009. Immediately before, her sister Serena won the longest ladies' semi-final ever, including saving a match point with a volley that hit the tape on its way to a winner. Venus hit only one unforced error.

2. Noppawan Lertcheewakam set the records for the longest name of a winner in the junior girls' singles and doubles when she won both in 2009.

3. Noppawan Lertcheewakam's nickname is the somewhat shorter Nok.

4. The records broken by John Isner and Nicolas Mahut in their match at Wimbledon last year were: 1. Longest match in games 4-6 6-3 7-6 6-7 70-68 (183, beating previous record of 112). 2. Longest match in time (11 hours 5 minutes cf 6 hours 33 minutes). 3. Most points (1080). 4. Most points won Mahut 502. 5. Most points lost Isner 478. 6. Longest set in games (138 cf 48). 7. Longest set in time (8 hours 18 minutes). 8. Most aces in a match (215 cf 96). 9. Most aces by a player (112 Isner cf 78). 10. Most times having to serve to stay in a match (Mahut 65). 11. Longest number of games in a set before getting a break point (101 ie 50). Mahut also won a qualifying match 24-22 in the third set. The massive margins by which they broke the previous records is a record in itself.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 24 June 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Monaco:

1. At 53, Prince Albert II of Monaco is somewhat older on his wedding day on 1 July than Prince William was on his.

2. Monaco has increased in area by 20 per cent since 1958 by land reclamation.

3. Only half of New York's Central Park could fit into the whole of Monaco.

4. Foreigners make up 80 per cent of Monaco's official population of 30,000.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 17 June 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Ivory Coast:

1. Although English-speakers don't call Germany Deutschland or Italy Italia, until this year's disturbance most media referred to Ivory Coast by its French name, Côte d'Ivoire.

2. The capital of Ivory Coast is Nidjamena Yamoussoukra.

3. A resident of Ivory Coast is called an Ivorian.

4. During this year's rebellion, 30,000 Ivorians were trapped in a church compound.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 10 June 2011

Answers to last week's questions of the British royal family:

1. In April this year Prince Charles broke the record for holding the title of heir apparent to the British throne for the longest time.

2. Two years ago Queen Elizabeth presented the Victoria Medal of Honour to Prince Charles. It was a garden award.

3. Prince William's full name and title is His Royal Highness Prince William Arthur Philip Louis, Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Strathearn, Baron Carrickfergus, Royal Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter.

4. The father of King George VI was King George V.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 3 June 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Bible statistics:

1. The King James Version of the Bible was published on May 2, 400 years ago.

2. The word that is used most often to begin sentences in the first book of the Bible, Genesis, is 'and'.

3. The word that ends all 26 verses of Psalm 136 is 'ever'.

4. There is no shortage of mentions of 40 in the Bible. It rained for 40 days and 40 nights when God wanted to cleanse the world and start over. Noah waited another 40 days after it rained before he opened a window in the Ark. Embalming required 40 days. Moses was on the mountain with God for 40 days twice. Moses' face shone after the 40 days on the mountain. It took the spies 40 days to search out the promised land and bring back fruit. The Israelites spent 40 years in the wilderness, one year for each day they explored the Promised Land. Goliath came for 40 days before being killed by David. Elijah went 40 days to Mount Horeb where the Lord passed by and he heard the voice of God. Jonah warned the City of Nineveh they had 40 days until God would overthrow the city. The people repented in those 40 days and God spared the city. Jesus fasted for 40 days in the wilderness. (www.40day.com/40_in_the_bible.html)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 27 May 2011

Answers to last week's questions on typewriters:

1. The world's last typewriter factory closed in Mumbai, India, last week. (Sun-Herald)

2. The longest word you can make using only the top row of letters on a typewriter is typewriter.

3. The three steps that early typewriters used for an exclamation mark were: full-stop, backspace, then the apostrophe. (Sydney Morning Herald)

4. Tom Sawyer was the first novel to be written on a typewriter.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 20 May 2011

Answers to last week's questions on boxing:

1. In boxing neither the spectators nor the participants know the score or the leader until the contest ends.

2. When two boxers are knocked out simultaneously, the winner is whoever was leading on points.

3. Heavyweight boxing champion Jack Dempsey also set a record as a wrestler. He lost 30 consecutive wrestling matches. (Lyle Brown's Sports Quiz)

4. What was unusual about Zowie Norford's win in the Australian Amateur Boxing League's controversial three-day tournament on the Gold Coast in November 1998? She was aged 11. (Telegraph)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 13 May 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Osama bin Laden:

1. 'A bad man, no lies' is an anagram of Osama bin Laden.

2. Osama bin Laden married four women and fathered about 25 children. (CNN)

3. Osama bin Laden was the 17th of 52 children of Mohamed Bin Laden.

4. His father was a builder responsible for 80% of Saudi Arabia's roads.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 6 May 2011

Answers to last week's questions on the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton:

1. Brian O'Driscoll declined his invitation to the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton because it co-incided with a training session. The previous two British prime ministers and President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama didn't attend because they weren't invited.

2. The King of Swaziland did not take his wives to London for the royal wedding. He was invited, but his 14 wives weren't.

3. The bride was 15 seconds late when she arrived at Westminster Abbey.

4. Prince William and Kate Middleton were married in The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster. It is popularly known as Westminster Abbey. From 1546 to 1556 it briefly held the status of cathedral. (Wikipedia)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 April 2011

Answers to last week's questions on British royalty:

1. A member of the British royal family cannot marry a Catholic. It is illegal under the Act of Settlement.

2. A Catholic cannot become king or queen of England, and consideration to amending this was reported last week to have been abandoned..

3. If the ruler's children are a boy and a girl, the boy has the right to succession irrespective of ages, but consideration is still being given to amending that.

4. The residents of Yaohnanen on Vanuatu's Tanna Island worship Prince Philip, or did until 10 June 2010, the day on which they believed that he would come to live with them.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 April 2011

Answers to last week’s questions on space exploration:

1. Yuri Gagarin became the first man to orbit the earth 50 years ago this month.

2. You can’t cry in space. There is no gravity so tears can’t flow. (Strange But True)

3. Two Russian cosmonauts were fined $6000 each in 1995 for refusing to do a sixth spacewalk because they said it was not in their contracts.

4. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, became the first human-made object to leave our solar system in 2006.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 April 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Yemen:

1. Just under half (46.3 per cent) of the population of Yemen is aged under 15. (yostours.com.ye)

2. The average age for marriage in Yemen is 12 to 13. (Reuters - alertnet.org/db/cp/yemen)

3. One spelling for the name of Yemen's capital is Sana'a.

4. Yemen is the only country's name beginning with 'Y'.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 April 2011

Answers to last week's questions on multiple marriages:

1. Glynn de Moss Wolfe, who married 29 times, was a marriage counsellor.

2. Zsa Zsa Gabor had nine husbands, so all options were correct.

3. Elizabeth Taylor married eight times.

4. Advertising agency and 2GB owner John Singleton has only had six wives.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 April 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Russian presidents:

1. Mikhail Gorbachev turned 80 on 2 March.

2. Former Russian president Mikhail Gorbachev starred in the 1998 Pizza Hut television advertisements. (Sydney Morning Herald)

3. All ten USSR/Russian presidents have alternated by being bald or having hair. (Nicholas: hair. Lenin: bald. Stalin:hair. Kruschev: bald. Brezhnev: hair. Andropov: bald. Chernenko: hair. Gorbachev: bald. Yelstin: hair. Putin: bald)

4. While in his teens, Joseph Stalin was in a theological seminary studying to be a priest.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 March 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Japan:

1. In a five-year period in the 1990s, 24 people died during the traditional Japanese activity of bowing.

2. Besides Japan, the only countries with names beginning with 'J' are Jamaica and Jordan.

3. After World War II, how was Japan legitimately able to label its products 'Made in USA' to avoid resentment of products labelled 'Made in Japan'? They renamed one of their industrial centres 'Usa'.

4. In the first week of August 1945 the Japanese emperor addressed his people by radio regarding surrender. This was the first time that they had ever heard his voice.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 March 2011

nswers to last week's questions on dwarfs:

1. Last week Khagendra Thapa Magar, the world's shortest man at 67cm, was on the steps of Sydney Opera House.

2. The only three verbs in common English usage that begin with "dw" are dwarf, dwell and dwindle.

3. The Seven Dwarfs were Bashful, Doc, Dopey, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy and Sneezy.

4. Dopey was the only dwarf with no beard.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 March 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Libya:

1. The official name of Libya is The Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

2. Man's first landing on the moon occurred in the same year as Colonel Gaddafi seized power in Libya.

3. The Libyan calendar is based on the death of Muhammad. (BBC)

4. Colonel Gaddafi was not smiling in any of the 24 billboards on the road from Tripoli's airport to the city. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 March 2011

Answers to last week's questions on New Zealand:

1. The New Zealand words 'dairy' and 'trundler' mean 'milk bar' and 'shopping trolley'.

2. The largest city in New Zealand in December 2001 was Middle Earth. Auckland was renamed Middle Earth for one week in that month to promote the New Zealand-made movie The Lord of the Rings. (Sunday Telegraph)

3. In the New Zealand territory Tokelau the seat of government changes annually to the next of its three coral atolls. Its total area is 12 square kilometres.

4. It is possible to get milk from Bulls. Bulls is a town in New Zealand midway between Wellington and Auckland. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 February 2011

Answers to last week's questions on Egypt:

1. Egypt has never had a democratic government.

2. Honey is the only food that may never go bad. Honey found in the tombs of the Egyptian pharaohs was edible.

3. Egyptians charged with the task of bandaging a mummy remove its brains through the nose by means of a hook. (Absolute Trivia)

4. Egyptian Fayez Mohammad's February 1999 plans to marry his neighbour's 17-year-old daughter were opposed by his family because they felt that at 114 he was too old to marry a 17-year-old, a 97-year difference. (Telegraph)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 February 2011

Answers to last week's questions on temperature:

1. The word for a metal which appears in most newspaper items about high temperatures is mercury.

2. An electric fan increases room temperature because of the heat its motor releases. The room seems cooler because the fan circulates air over your skin.

3. Dry ice doesn't melt. It evaporates.

4. The only temperature at which the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales are the same is minus 40 degrees.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 February 2011

Answers to last week's questions on flags

1. The only flag that appears on other nations' flags is the UK's Union Jack.

2. Other than small island countries (eg Fiji and Tuvalu), the only three countries that retain the Union Jack on their flags are Britain, Australia and New Zealand.

3. The only state of the USA that still shows the Union Jack on its flag is Hawaii.

4. Greenland's flag is red and white

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 February 2011

Answers to last week's questions on tennis:

1. In the third round of the 2011 Australian ladies' singles the player with the shortest name (4 letters) defeated the one with the longest name (24 letters, or six times as long).

2. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova is the wife of Jacob Zahlava and daughter of Jindrich Stryc. (Sydney Morning Herald)

3. Which country had the most players in the quarter-finals of this year's Australian ladies' championship? It was a tie, with one each for Belgium, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland and Russia.

4. None of the world's top 100 men players are teenagers. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 January 2011

Answers to last week's questions on floods:

1. During the January flood, Brisbane's Drift Restaurant pontoon broke away and it drifted down the Brisbane River.

2. The person responsible for releasing water over dam spillways in south-east Queensland is Dan Spiller. (Sydney Morning Herald)

3. Three-quarters of Bangladesh was under water at its flood peak in 1998. (Sydney Morning Herald)

4. The number of people left homeless after floods in India in 1998 was 30 million.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 January 2011

Answers to last week's final questions on light globes:

1. How many jerks who ask stupid questions does it take to change a light globe?
Change it to what?

2. How many anglers does it take to change a light globe?
Five, and you should have seen the light globe. It must have been this big!

3. How many people with dyslexia does it take to change a light globe?
Eno

4. One.
How many psychics does it take to change a light globe? (SMH)

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 January 2011

Answers to last week's questions on light globes:

1. How many Spaniards does it take to change a light globe?
Juan

2. How many politicians does it take to change a light globe?
The Government is well aware of the situation and is setting up a committee to look into the feasibility of changing it.

3. How many ignoramuses does it take to change a light globe?
None. They would rather stay in the dark.

4. How many light globes does it take to change a light globe?
Two – the old one and the new one.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 January 2011

Answers to last week's questions on light globes:

1. How many jugglers does it take to change a light globe?
Only one, but he needs at least three globes.

2. How many cops does it take to change a light globe?
None. It turned itself in.

3. How many lawyers does it take to change a light globe?
One, but he'll bill you for five.

4. How many tourists does it take to change a light globe?
One to hold the globe and five to ask directions.


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Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014 and at Free Trivia Answers 2015 and at Free Trivia Answers 2016 and at Free Trivia Answers 2017

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